Angels to keep struggling Ervin Santana on “out count”

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Ervin Santana’s brutal season continued Saturday, as he failed to make it out of the second inning against the Rangers while serving up three homers and allowing six runs.

Santana is now 4-10 with a 6.00 ERA and 23 homers allowed in 111 innings and the Angels are 5-14 when he starts compared to 47-30 when anyone else takes the mound.

And yet instead of simply dumping Santana from the rotation manager Mike Scioscia will continue to start him every fifth day while putting him on an “out count.” Rather than limiting his pitches Scioscia has decided to keep Santana in the game for 15 outs–in other words, five innings–at which point he’ll be removed for a reliever.

Alden Gonzalez of MLB.com writes that the idea is to keep Santana from having to go through a lineup for a fourth time while giving him more leeway to be aggressive. He also notes that Scioscia employed a similar strategy with a struggling Scott Kazmir and … well, he’s now pitching in an independent league at age 28, so suffice it to say the “out count” didn’t work any magic on Kazmir.

It’s also worth noting that Santana has averaged 17.5 outs per start this season and failed to record even six outs in two of his last three starts. Having to go through the lineup for a third and fourth time hasn’t really been the issue.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.