Cliff Pennington lands on disabled list with sprained bat

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Well, technically it’s with a sore elbow, but no one is buying that excuse.

The A’s placed Cliff Pennigton on the disabled list after his latest 0-for Thursday. He had gone hitless in four straight games, taking his average down to .197 for the season. That comes with just 17 extra-base hits, 16 RBI and 23 walks in 284 at-bats, so he’s been a huge drag on the offense. He ranks dead last in the majors in OPS among qualified batters:

156. Pennington: .541
155. Dee Gordon (SS LAD): .562
154. Justin Smoak (1B Sea): .600
153. Jamey Carroll (INF Min): .606
152. Cameron Maybin (CF SD): .615
151. Robert Andino (2B Bal): .617
150. Jordan Schafer (CF Hou): .617
149. Jemile Weeks (2B Oak): .619
148. Brandon Crawford (SS SF): .623
147. Placido Polanco (3B Phi): .627

Eric Sogard was called up to replace Pennington and will share time at shortstop with Brandon Hicks. The A’s are in the market for an upgrade, with Yunel Escobar and Stephen Drew serving as possibilities.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.