Aspiring sportscaster among the dead in Aurora, Colorado

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The news from Aurora Colorado this morning is awful and tragic. People just wanted to go to a movie and some sick person rains tragedy down on countless lives. Tragedy that will last forever.

There’s horrible evil in the world. We all know this on some level and always have known it. One of the best aspects of the human spirit is that we still go on despite knowing this, probably because we are genetically gifted with the ability to push horror out of our minds. If we couldn’t do that we’d just give up and never bring children into the world. Of course that means when we’re reminded of its existence it’s shocking and jarring.

One of the victims of the shooting was Jessica Ghawi. She was an aspiring sportscaster — hockey mostly — and occasional sports blogger for Busted Coverage and her own blog. Just last month she was in Toronto for the Easton Center shooting and wrote about it. And now she and, at this writing, 11 other people are gone and 50 are injured because of a sick person’s decision to make it so.

We’ll try to understand it all. Ultimately we’ll fail, because that’s the nature of unspeakable evil. But in the meantime we’ll hopefully spend some time remembering how precious and fleeing our time is here and appreciating all that we’ve had and all that we’ve lost.

 

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Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.