The Yankees hit a lot of home runs. This is a problem?


There’s nothing  more annoying than fans of an otherwise awesome team obsessing on that team’s flaws. Or what the fans perceive to be flaws. They’re baseball’s version of First World Problems, really. The rest of us — who follow legitimately flawed teams — don’t really want to hear it.

This year it’s Yankees fans — driven by some media folks, actually — complaining that the Yanks are too home run-dependent. Never mind that they are clearly the best team in baseball and hold a ten-game lead in what is supposed to be the toughest division in the game.  They hit too many home runs, the argument goes, and if they want to go far in the playoffs, they have to learn to manufacture runs.

Today Ken Davidoff of the New York Post examines that bit of wisdom. And finds that, really, there isn’t anything to the notion that a team has to play a certain brand of baseball in order to win the World Series. Check it out.

It may be frustrated to see your powerful sluggers mowed down in the postseason and I suppose it’s understandable to then think that a team built around the longball is doomed come October. But the fact is that the postseason is short, stuff happens and complaining that your team hits too many home runs to win a World Series is just nothing anyone wants to hear.

Report: Athletics sign Trevor Cahill to one-year deal

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Free agent right-hander Trevor Cahill reportedly has a one-year deal in place with the Athletics, according to’s Jane Lee. The exact terms have yet to be disclosed, and as the agreement is still pending a physical, it has not been formally announced by the club.

Cahill, 30, is coming off of a decent, albeit underwhelming year with the Padres and Royals. He kicked off the 2017 season with a 4-3 record in 11 starts for the Padres, then split his time between the rotation and bullpen after a midseason trade to the Royals. By the end of the year, the righty led the league with 16 wild pitches and had racked up a 4.93 ERA, 4.8 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 in 84 innings for the two teams.

The A’s found themselves in desperate need of rotation depth this week after Jharel Cotton announced he’d miss the 2018 season to undergo Tommy John surgery. Right now, the team is considering some combination of Andrew Triggs, Daniel Gossett, Daniel Mengden and Paul Blackburn for the back end of the rotation — a mix that seems unlikely to change in the last two weeks before Opening Day, as Lee points out that Cahill won’t be ready to shoulder a full workload by then. Instead, he’s expected to begin the year in the bullpen and work his way up to a starting role, where the A’s hope he’ll replicate the All-Star numbers he produced with them back in 2010.