The Royals win the competitive balance lottery

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We haven’t talked about it much, but one of the nifty new features of the new collective bargaining agreement is something called the competitive balance lottery. What is the competitive balance lottery? Here’s MLB’s description:

The Competitive Balance Lottery … gives Clubs with the lowest revenues and in the smallest markets the opportunity to obtain additional draft picks through a lottery.  The 10 Clubs with the lowest revenues and the 10 Clubs in the smallest markets were entered into a lottery for the six selections immediately following the first round of the First-Year Player Draft.  The eligible Clubs that did not receive one of the six selections after the first round, and all other payee Clubs under the Revenue Sharing Plan, were entered into a second lottery for the six picks immediately following the second round of the Draft.  A Club’s odds of winning the lottery were based on its prior season’s winning percentage.

And the results:

ROUND A

(Following First Round)

1)   Kansas City Royals

2)   Pittsburgh Pirates

3)   Arizona Diamondbacks

4)   Baltimore Orioles

5)   Cincinnati Reds

6)   Miami Marlins

ROUND B

(Following Second Round)

1)   San Diego Padres

2)   Cleveland Indians

3)   Colorado Rockies

4)   Oakland Athletics

5)   Milwaukee Brewers

6)   Detroit Tigers

These are where the old sandwich picks — the free agent compensation picks — used to be. So, huzzah for the Royals, but it’s not like these alter the balance of power or anything.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.