Will Derek Jeter be the first unanimous Hall of Fame inductee? Probably not, thanks to the schmucks

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Alan Hoskins of the Kansas City Kansan asked several experts — ESPN people and some respected baseball writers — if they think Derek Jeter will be the first unanimously-elected Hall of Fame inductee.

The response was itself unanimous: nope. No one, of course, argued that it was because he wasn’t deserving of first-ballot induction because that’s nuts. Rather, all of them noted the following concept, most eloquently stated by Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post:

“Might but there’s always some schmuck who just won’t vote for it. Maybe Greg Maddux. But a lot of great ones didn’t make it.”

There is always some schmuck, isn’t there?  Two kinds of schmucks, really. The first kind is the “I vote for no one in the Steroid Era because I know everything and will turn in a blank ballot to draw attention to myself –er, I mean to protest some Great Wrong” guy. These people are terrible, by the way. Really the worst kind of person.

The other schmucks: guys who say that since Willie Mays didn’t get unanimously elected, no one should. Because the best way to right past wrongs is to repeat them.

Bah. There are a lot of people who should have been unanimously elected. The next one, as several of them note, should be Greg Maddux, but won’t be because some schmuck will come up with a reason. The next one should probably be Jeter and some other schmuck won’t vote for him either, because of some other schmucky reason.

Schmuck schmuck schmuck.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.