We live in an age of “paradoxical pharamacological puritanism”

48 Comments

Via Sullivan, a pretty great essay by Greg Downey about just how irrational the anti-PED crusade is in sports. After an extended — really, really extended history of doping in sports — Downey notes that, hey, the entire world is using various forms of steroids and other performance enhancers yet, for some reason, athletes are expected to be using them less and less. The money quote:

The irony is that we punish severely the people who could use steroids the most, the athletes who have the most legitimate need for them if they are to recover and perform at the levels we like to watch on television and in stadiums. Using steroids because we no longer get the same erections we once had, or because a middle-aged man has less energy than he did at twenty (or a woman has less libido than considered ideal), is increasingly considered normal, while the list of substances banned for people like Mark McGwire grows longer and longer, the invasive tests intended to expose any transgression more and more extensive. As a society, we suffer from a paradoxical pharamacological puritanism, expecting medical technology to change our lives and yet demanding that it not change our games.

I understand the idea of the unfair playing field being problematic. But it’s possible to have a level playing field without going on a fatwah against PEDs. We don’t, in sports anyway, seem to have any appetite to see what is safe, what is not, what is useful, what is not and to actually figure out how various drugs could be used in ways that are truly helpful to athletes as opposed to something that only provides some sort of unfair advantage to one over another based on the latter’s unwillingness to do something that could harm him.

The result: we have a blanket prohibition like any other sort of blanket prohibition which results in secretive use and, in all likelihood, a continued unsafe and unfair playing field.

But I really am struck by the disparity between our personal use of all manner of PEDs as a society and our demand that athletes be so damn pure. I guess it’s a function of part of our enjoyment of sports being the notion that these people are doing things we could not possibly do. Which used to be hitting a baseball really far. And now includes recovering from injuries without drugs that would be really, really useful in that regard.

Chi Chi Gonzalez to undergo Tommy John surgery

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Rangers’ right-hander Chi Chi Gonzalez is slated for Tommy John surgery, according to a report by Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News. Gonzalez was placed on the 60-day disabled list back in early April with a partial UCL tear and was working towards a throwing program before getting sidelined with more elbow pain. He’s expected to miss the entirety of the 2018 season while recovering from the surgery.

This is the second straight season that has been derailed for Gonzalez due to injury. The 25-year-old starter pitched just 10 1/3 innings in 2016 after recovering from a torn UCL, and was optioned to Triple-A Round Rock to finish out the year after compiling an 8.71 ERA, 7.8 BB/9 and 6.1 SO/9 in three starts with the club. He showed more promise in Triple-A with a 4.70 ERA, 2.9 BB/9 and 5.9 SO/9 through 24 starts and 138 innings.

It’s a tough blow for the Rangers, who have seen Gonzalez healthy in just one major league season to date. General manager Jon Daniels told reporters that a recent MRI showed signs of weakening in the ligament, which disrupted the team’s plans to have the right-hander stick to a six- to eight-week recovery timetable after getting a platelet-rich plasma injection (via Stefan Stevenson of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram). The surgery is expected to take place next week and will put Gonzalez’s earliest return date sometime in September 2018.

Blue Jays place Aaron Sanchez on 10-day disabled list with blister issue

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Blue Jays placed right-hander Aaron Sanchez on the 10-day disabled list with a blister on his right middle finger, the club announced Saturday. This marks the fourth disabled list stint for Sanchez this season after blister issues cropped up again during his start against the Red Sox on Wednesday. Per MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm, there is still no estimated timetable for his return to the mound.

Sanchez, 25, has made just eight starts for the Blue Jays in 2017. Between multiple trips to the DL, he’s racked up a 4.25 ERA, 5.0 BB/9 and 6.0 SO/9 through 36 innings and currently carries a 1-3 record. He started to look stable after delivering his first quality start last week, but lasted only four innings against Boston on Wednesday night and issued six hits, five runs and two strikeouts in another losing effort.

In a corresponding move, the Blue Jays activated right-hander Joe Smith from the 10-day disabled list (right shoulder inflammation) and recalled fellow righty Chris Smith from Triple-A Buffalo. Left-handed reliever Jeff Beliveau, who suffered in an eight-run inning during Friday’s 13-3 loss to the Indians, was designated for assignment.