We live in an age of “paradoxical pharamacological puritanism”

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Via Sullivan, a pretty great essay by Greg Downey about just how irrational the anti-PED crusade is in sports. After an extended — really, really extended history of doping in sports — Downey notes that, hey, the entire world is using various forms of steroids and other performance enhancers yet, for some reason, athletes are expected to be using them less and less. The money quote:

The irony is that we punish severely the people who could use steroids the most, the athletes who have the most legitimate need for them if they are to recover and perform at the levels we like to watch on television and in stadiums. Using steroids because we no longer get the same erections we once had, or because a middle-aged man has less energy than he did at twenty (or a woman has less libido than considered ideal), is increasingly considered normal, while the list of substances banned for people like Mark McGwire grows longer and longer, the invasive tests intended to expose any transgression more and more extensive. As a society, we suffer from a paradoxical pharamacological puritanism, expecting medical technology to change our lives and yet demanding that it not change our games.

I understand the idea of the unfair playing field being problematic. But it’s possible to have a level playing field without going on a fatwah against PEDs. We don’t, in sports anyway, seem to have any appetite to see what is safe, what is not, what is useful, what is not and to actually figure out how various drugs could be used in ways that are truly helpful to athletes as opposed to something that only provides some sort of unfair advantage to one over another based on the latter’s unwillingness to do something that could harm him.

The result: we have a blanket prohibition like any other sort of blanket prohibition which results in secretive use and, in all likelihood, a continued unsafe and unfair playing field.

But I really am struck by the disparity between our personal use of all manner of PEDs as a society and our demand that athletes be so damn pure. I guess it’s a function of part of our enjoyment of sports being the notion that these people are doing things we could not possibly do. Which used to be hitting a baseball really far. And now includes recovering from injuries without drugs that would be really, really useful in that regard.

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.