We live in an age of “paradoxical pharamacological puritanism”

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Via Sullivan, a pretty great essay by Greg Downey about just how irrational the anti-PED crusade is in sports. After an extended — really, really extended history of doping in sports — Downey notes that, hey, the entire world is using various forms of steroids and other performance enhancers yet, for some reason, athletes are expected to be using them less and less. The money quote:

The irony is that we punish severely the people who could use steroids the most, the athletes who have the most legitimate need for them if they are to recover and perform at the levels we like to watch on television and in stadiums. Using steroids because we no longer get the same erections we once had, or because a middle-aged man has less energy than he did at twenty (or a woman has less libido than considered ideal), is increasingly considered normal, while the list of substances banned for people like Mark McGwire grows longer and longer, the invasive tests intended to expose any transgression more and more extensive. As a society, we suffer from a paradoxical pharamacological puritanism, expecting medical technology to change our lives and yet demanding that it not change our games.

I understand the idea of the unfair playing field being problematic. But it’s possible to have a level playing field without going on a fatwah against PEDs. We don’t, in sports anyway, seem to have any appetite to see what is safe, what is not, what is useful, what is not and to actually figure out how various drugs could be used in ways that are truly helpful to athletes as opposed to something that only provides some sort of unfair advantage to one over another based on the latter’s unwillingness to do something that could harm him.

The result: we have a blanket prohibition like any other sort of blanket prohibition which results in secretive use and, in all likelihood, a continued unsafe and unfair playing field.

But I really am struck by the disparity between our personal use of all manner of PEDs as a society and our demand that athletes be so damn pure. I guess it’s a function of part of our enjoyment of sports being the notion that these people are doing things we could not possibly do. Which used to be hitting a baseball really far. And now includes recovering from injuries without drugs that would be really, really useful in that regard.

Report: Mets showing interest in Bartolo Colon

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Last month, free agent right-hander Bartolo Colon told reporters that he’d be open to taking a minor league deal in 2018, but only if he was guaranteed a return to the Mets’ system. The 44-year-old starter is nearing the end of a 20-year career, and it makes sense that he’d want to have one last hurrah in the city where he had some of his most productive years.

Now, Twins starter Ervin Santana tells Mike Berardino of the Pioneer Press, it looks like the Mets might also be open to a reunion. It’s doubtful that Colon has all that much left in the tank, especially following a combined 7-14 record and 6.48 ERA for the Braves and Twins last year, but he’s not necessarily looking to reproduce the 15+ win, sub-4.00 ERA totals of years past.

Instead, Santana says, Colon is seeking the opportunity to win just six more games. He’ll enter the 2018 season five wins shy of the all-time record for a Latin American-born player, and is hoping to claim that title for himself before he enters retirement in 2019. Former Orioles and Expos hurler Dennis Martinez currently holds the record after clinching his 245th win back in 1998. While it took Colon a full season of starts to come up with even seven wins in 2017, he’s only one year removed from a 15-win campaign in 2016. Provided that the Mets are willing to gamble on him again, the milestone may not be that far out of reach.