We live in an age of “paradoxical pharamacological puritanism”

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Via Sullivan, a pretty great essay by Greg Downey about just how irrational the anti-PED crusade is in sports. After an extended — really, really extended history of doping in sports — Downey notes that, hey, the entire world is using various forms of steroids and other performance enhancers yet, for some reason, athletes are expected to be using them less and less. The money quote:

The irony is that we punish severely the people who could use steroids the most, the athletes who have the most legitimate need for them if they are to recover and perform at the levels we like to watch on television and in stadiums. Using steroids because we no longer get the same erections we once had, or because a middle-aged man has less energy than he did at twenty (or a woman has less libido than considered ideal), is increasingly considered normal, while the list of substances banned for people like Mark McGwire grows longer and longer, the invasive tests intended to expose any transgression more and more extensive. As a society, we suffer from a paradoxical pharamacological puritanism, expecting medical technology to change our lives and yet demanding that it not change our games.

I understand the idea of the unfair playing field being problematic. But it’s possible to have a level playing field without going on a fatwah against PEDs. We don’t, in sports anyway, seem to have any appetite to see what is safe, what is not, what is useful, what is not and to actually figure out how various drugs could be used in ways that are truly helpful to athletes as opposed to something that only provides some sort of unfair advantage to one over another based on the latter’s unwillingness to do something that could harm him.

The result: we have a blanket prohibition like any other sort of blanket prohibition which results in secretive use and, in all likelihood, a continued unsafe and unfair playing field.

But I really am struck by the disparity between our personal use of all manner of PEDs as a society and our demand that athletes be so damn pure. I guess it’s a function of part of our enjoyment of sports being the notion that these people are doing things we could not possibly do. Which used to be hitting a baseball really far. And now includes recovering from injuries without drugs that would be really, really useful in that regard.

Adam Eaton sustains leg injury after tripping over first base

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Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton was carried off the field after stumbling over first base on Friday night. In the ninth inning of the Nationals’ 7-5 loss to the Mets, Eaton appeared to catch his ankle on the bag as he ran out an infield single, suffering a leg injury on the fall. He was unable to put pressure on his left leg after the play and required assistance by two of the Nationals’ athletic trainers as he exited the field.

Eaton is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday, but Nationals’ manager Dusty Baker told reporters that it “doesn’t look too good.” It’s the first significant leg injury the outfielder has sustained since 2014, when he went on the 15-day disabled list with a hamstring strain. He’ll likely be replaced by Michael Taylor in center field for the next couple of games, though that could be a temporary fix as the Nationals seek a better solution during Eaton’s recovery process.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.