Jays pull Anthony Gose from Triple-A game ahead of possible callup

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I assumed either Eric Thames or Travis Snider would come up to help replace the injured Jose Bautista in right field in Toronto, but it appears the Blue Jays have other plans.

Anthony Gose, one of the fastest players in the minors, was pulled out of the game for Triple-A Las Vegas tonight, indicating that he could be called up Tuesday.

The 21-year-old Gose is hitting .293/.376/.434 with five homers and 29 steals for Las Vegas this season. That is one of the top environments for offense in the minors, but oddly enough, most of Gose’s production has come on the road; he’s hitting .323/.399/.469 in away games this season.

Gose is the best defensive outfielder in the Jays organization, which will make for an interesting decision for Toronto. Do they temporarily shift Colby Rasmus to right, even though he’s playing well at the moment? Or do they put Gose there, even though he’s the better defender and his entire career in right field amounts to six appearances in 2008-09? Given that Rasmus has a history of dealing with adversity poorly, Gose to right seems like the better move to me.

Frankly, I still think Snider or Thames makes more sense. Gose is an intriguing talent, but he strikes out an awful lot for a guy with middling power (93 times in 92 games this season). He’s still pretty raw, and since the Jays don’t need him as a center fielder, I think it’d be best to leave him in Triple-A until September.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.