Lenny Dykstra pleads guilty in bankruptcy fraud case

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Lenny Dykstra’s legal problems continue to mount, as the Associated Press reports that the former All-Star outfielder pleaded guilty Friday to three counts related to a bankruptcy fraud case in Los Angeles. He could face a maximum 20 years in prison when he’s sentenced on December 3.

According to Reuters, Dykstra admitted defrauding creditors by declaring bankruptcy in 2009 and then stealing or destroying furnishings, baseball memorabilia and other property from his $18.5 million mansion. He also admitted to giving false or misleading testimony about what was removed from the home.

As part of a plea deal with prosecutors, Dykstra has waived his right to appeal if he is sentenced to no more than 51 months in prison and $200,000 in restitution.

Dykstra is already serving a three-year prison sentence in California after pleading no contest to grand theft auto and providing a false financial statement. In April, he was sentenced to nine months in jail and 36 months probation after pleading no contest to assault with a deadly weapon and lewd conduct.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.