Lenny Dykstra pleads guilty in bankruptcy fraud case

17 Comments

Lenny Dykstra’s legal problems continue to mount, as the Associated Press reports that the former All-Star outfielder pleaded guilty Friday to three counts related to a bankruptcy fraud case in Los Angeles. He could face a maximum 20 years in prison when he’s sentenced on December 3.

According to Reuters, Dykstra admitted defrauding creditors by declaring bankruptcy in 2009 and then stealing or destroying furnishings, baseball memorabilia and other property from his $18.5 million mansion. He also admitted to giving false or misleading testimony about what was removed from the home.

As part of a plea deal with prosecutors, Dykstra has waived his right to appeal if he is sentenced to no more than 51 months in prison and $200,000 in restitution.

Dykstra is already serving a three-year prison sentence in California after pleading no contest to grand theft auto and providing a false financial statement. In April, he was sentenced to nine months in jail and 36 months probation after pleading no contest to assault with a deadly weapon and lewd conduct.

A-Rod to join ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball booth

Getty Images
5 Comments

Alex Rodriguez’s post-retirement renaissance continues apace. After starring as a studio host for Fox’s playoff coverage over the past couple of years, A-Rod is about to be named to, arguably, televised baseball’s top job: color commentary in ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball booth.

Michael McCarthy of The Sporting News is hearing that ESPN is going to give the gig, vacated by Aaron Boone by virtue of his hiring by the Yankees, to Rodriguez. There he’ll join Jessica Mendoza and whoever they get to replace play-by-play man Dan Shulman, who chose to step back from the Sunday night job following last season. This, by the way, marks the second time A-Rod has taken over Aaron Boone’s job given that he replaced Boone at third base for the Yankees in 2004.

The twist: A-Rod is likely to keep his Fox postseason job too. While some broadcasters work for multiple networks, it’s pretty rare for Fox to allow its talents to work for competitors like that. Apparently they believe keeping A-Rod — who five years ago was one of the most despised figures in baseball — is worth it. What a difference a few years makes.

In other news, Alex Rodriguez is likely to be shunned mightily by the current crop of BBWAA voters when he hits the Hall of Fame ballot in a couple of years. At the rate he’s going, though, their successors will put him in Cooperstown via the Ford Frick Award sometime in the 2040s.