Nationals pitching coach: “strikeouts are bulls***”


Nationals’ pitching coach Steve McCatty spoke with Yahoo!’s Les Carpenter and gave a less entertaining version of Crash Davis’ “strikeouts are boring, besides that, they’re fascist” speech:

“Strikeouts are bull[bleep],” he says … If you try to strike out every hitter you’re going to burn up pitches … Look, just do the math. If you’re taking 15-20 pitches to get through every inning that will multiply fast.”  He would rather his pitchers let the hitters hit the ball.

Probably worth noting that:

  • The Nationals are fifth in all of baseball and third in the NL in strikeouts per nine innings; and
  • Their two best starters, Stephen Strasburg and Gio Gonzalez, are striking out 11.6 and 10.4 batters per nine innings, respectively, which is number one and number three in all of baseball among starters.

Indeed, there is almost a perfect correlation between how many wins a Nationals pitcher has and how many he’s striking out: the more the better.

Which doesn’t mean that McCatty doesn’t have a point. Ideally, yes, you want your pitcher to throw fewer pitches if possible and striking out guys takes more pitches. But it’s also true that the best way to control damage as a pitcher is to allow fewer opportunities for things to go wrong. Contact can lead to errors and seeing-eye hits and homers and all kinds of bad things. Strikeouts, not so much.  Throw strikes and try to miss bats and you’re gonna be successful. And often times, a lot of strikeouts is the byproduct of that.

All of this reminds me of hitting coaches who get all worked up about wanting their hitters to take the ball to the opposite field, shorten their swing and not strike out despite the fact that the team’s best hitter is almost certainly a dude who pulls the ball with authority.

Justin Turner suffers broken wrist after being hit by a pitch

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Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner left Monday’s Cactus League game against the Athletics after he was hit by a pitch. He went for X-rays, revealing that he suffered a broken wrist, Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports. Shaikin adds that Turner is unlikely to return before May, noting that Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman missed six weeks with a similar injury last year and Astros outfielder George Springer missed nine weeks in 2015.

Needless to say, this is a huge loss for the Dodgers. Last year, Turner hit .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI in 543 plate appearances, helping the Dodgers reach the World Series. He made the All-Star team for the first time in his career and finished eighth in NL MVP balloting.

Thankfully, the Dodgers have some versatile players on the roster. Logan Forsythe could move from second base to third, giving Chase Utley more playing time at second. Enrique Hernandez could man the hot corner as well. Chris Taylor has played some third base, or he could shift to second base in Forsythe’s stead. The club should shed some light on how it plans to move forward following Turner’s injury.