Jon Lester, despite reports to the contrary, loves Boston

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Peter Gammons on the radio yesterday when asked about the possibility of the Red Sox trading Jon Lester in the offseason:

“I just sense that Jon is so unhappy here that I’m sure it would be good for him”

Jon Lester on Twitter last night:

While Lester is not dumb and would be well-advised to say such things no matter what his feelings are about Boston, I believe that one of the biggest areas of danger for anyone outside the clubhouse is to do that thing where we try to get inside a player’s head and try to figure out what they’re thinking.

It’s understandable why we do it. It’s human nature to try to figure out what other people are thinking. It’s tempting to try to reconcile and understand the stuff we see in a player’s performance with reference to assumptions about their feelings. I do it sometimes too even though I should know better.

But  it’s way too easy to just whiff on that stuff or, more often, reduce a complicated set of circumstances to simple judgments like “player X is unhappy” or whatever. And while that initial judgment like Gammons’ here is fairly benign, it’s the kind of thing that gets picked up by lesser reporters, then the radio people and then common fan as some definite truth: “Lester hates Boston! Screw him!” And that leads to the toxic kind of atmosphere we often see in places like, hey, Boston.

Gammons knows a lot of people in the Red Sox front office and may have greater insight into this than we do. But when it comes to a player’s happiness, I think the odds of anyone not particularly close to him knowing anything useful about it are pretty low, and the risk of misunderstanding a given situation through such assumptions becomes pretty high.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

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It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

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The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.