The worst of the worst at the All-Star break

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Because the non-All-Stars deserve recognition too — even when they’d prefer to hide their faces — here’s a look at some midpoint leaderboards in reverse order.

OPS
1. Dee Gordon (SS LAD): .562
2. Cliff Pennington (SS Oak): .563
3. Cameron Maybin (CF SD): .596
4. Jamey Carroll (INF Min): .597
5. Justin Smoak (1B Sea): .597
6. Robert Andino (2B Bal): .611
7. Jemile Weeks (2B Oak): .620
8. Brandon Crawford (SS SF): .621
9. Alexei Ramirez (SS CWS): .628
10. Jordan Schafer (CF Hou): .634

Fangraphs WAR – position players
1. Ryan Raburn (2B Det): -1.4
2. Chone Figgins (UT Sea): -1.3
3. Brennan Boesch (RF Det): -1.3
4. Endy Chavez (LF Bal): -1.2
5. Chris Coghlan (CF Mia): -1.2
6. Tyler Pastornicky (SS Atl): -1.1
7. Brian Roberts (2B Bal): -1.0
8. Emmanuel Burriss (INF SF): -1.0
9. Marlon Byrd (CF ChC/Bos): -1.0
10. Jeff Francoeur (RF KC): -0.9

Baseball-reference WAR – position players
1. Francoeur: -1.9
2. Pastornicky: -1.6
3. Michael Young (DH Tex): -1.6
4. Raburn: -1.5
5. Coghlan: -1.5
6. Boesch: -1.4
7. Rickie Weeks (2B Mil): -1.4
8. Dee Gordon: -1.3
9. Endy Chavez: -1.1
10. Gaby Sanchez (1B Mia): -1.1

Outs made
1. J.J. Hardy (SS Bal): 287
2. Ichiro Suzuki (RF Sea): 275
2. Ian Kinsler (2B Tex): 275
4. Jimmy Rollins (SS Phi): 269
5. Derek Jeter (SS NYY): 264
6. Starlin Castro (SS ChC): 262
6. Jose Reyes (SS Mia): 262
8. Yunel Escobar (SS Tor): 261
9. M. Young: 260
9. Ian Desmond (SS Was): 260

Stolen-base percentage (min. 5 attempts)
1. Miguel Olivo (C Sea): 20% (1-for-5)
1. Francoeur: 20% (1-for-5)
3. David DeJesus (OF ChC): 29% (2-for-7)
4. Matt Kemp (CF LAD): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Jason Bourgeois (OF KC): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Evan Longoria (3B TB): 40% (2-for-5)
4. Asdrubal Cabrera (SS Cle): 40% (2-for-5)
8. Willie Bloomquist (INF Ari): 43% (6-for-14)
8. Justin Ruggiano (OF Mia): 43% (3-for-7)
8. Collin Cowgill (OF Oak): 43% (3-for-7)

ERA (qualified for ERA title)
1. Tim Lincecum (SF): 6.42
2. Jake Arrieta (Bal): 6.13
3. Mike Minor (Atl): 5.97
4. Randy Wolf (Mil): 5.80
5. Hector Noesi (Sea): 5.77
6. Ervin Santana (LAA): 5.75
7. Clay Buchholz (Bos): 5.53
8. Ricky Romero (Tor): 5.22
9. Bruce Chen (KC): 5.22
10. J.A. Happ (Hou): 5.14

ERA (min. 20 IP)
1. Manny Acosta (NYM): 11.86
2. Josh Outman (Col): 9.00
3. Guillermo Moscoso (Col): 8.23
4. Nick Blackburn (Min): 8.10
5. Chris Volstad (ChC): 7.94
6. Chien-Ming Wang (Was): 7.61
7. Daniel Hudson (Ari): 7.35
8. Jhoulys Chacin (Col): 7.30
9. Jesse Chavez (Tor): 7.08
10. Liam Hendriks (Min): 7.04

fWAR
1. Bobby Cassevah (LAA): -0.7
2. Acosta: -0.7
3. Josh Lindblom (LAD): -0.7
4. Blackburn: -0.6
5. Mark Rzepczynski (StL): -0.6
6. Brad Brach (SD): -0.5
7. Rafael Dolis (ChC): -0.5
8. Noesi: -0.5
9. Collin Balester (Det): -0.5
10. Francisco Cordero (Tor): -0.5

rWAR
1. Lincecum: -2.0
2. Acosta: -1.9
3. Blackburn: -1.8
4. Minor: -1.7
5. Volstad: -15
6. Heath Bell (Mia): -1.3
7. E. Santana: -1.3
8. Jason Marquis (Min/SD): -1.2
9. Hendriks: -1.2
10. Noesi: -1.2

Quality start percentage (qualified for ERA title)
1. Lincecum: 22.2%
2. Wolf: 29.4%
2. Erik Bedard (Pit): 29.4%
4. Minor: 31.3%
5. Randall Delgado (Atl): 31.3%
6. Arrieta: 33.3%
7. Lucas Harrell (Hou): 35.3%
8. Buchholz: 35.7%
9. Matt Moore (TB): 41.2%
9. Noesi: 41.2%
9. Dan Haren (LAA): 41.2%
9. E. Santana: 41.2%
9. Luke Hochevar (KC): 41.2%

Blown saves (closers)
1. Brandon League (Sea): 6 in 15 chances
1. H. Bell: 6 in 25 chances
3. John Axford (Mil): 5 in 20 chances
4. Aroldis Chapman (Cin): 4 in 15 chances
4. Rafael Betancourt (Col): 4 in 19 chances
4. Alfredo Aceves: 4 in 23 chances
4. Jason Motte (StL): 4 in 24 chances
4. Santiago Casilla (SF): 4 in 25 chances

Blown saves (setup men)
1. Chad Qualls (Phi/NYY): 5
1. Rzepczynski (StL): 5
3. Pedro Strop (Bal): 4
3. David Hernandez (Ari): 4
3. Andrew Cashner (SD): 4
3. Rex Brothers (Col): 4
3. Francisco Rodriguez (Mil): 4

Twins place Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with shin injury

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The Twins have placed third baseman Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with a stress reaction in his left shin, per the Star Tribune’s LaVelle E. Neal. Sano left Saturday’s game against the Diamondbacks after running out a ground ball double play in the fourth inning and was held out of Sunday’s lineup.

Sano, 24, is batting .267/.356/.514 with 28 home runs and 77 RBI in 475 plate appearances this season. The Twins are five back of the Indians for first place in the AL Central and currently hold a tie with the Angels for the second Wild Card slot.

Ehire Adrianza got the start at third base during Sunday’s win and could handle the hot corner while Sano is out. Eduardo Escobar could also get some time at third.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.