Prince Fielder wins his second Home Run Derby crown


We made it, you guys.

Another Home Run Derby is in the rear view mirror, as Prince Fielder defeated Jose Bautista in the finals tonight to take home this year’s crown. It was Fielder’s second Home Run Derby win, the other coming back in 2009 in St. Louis. Ken Griffey, Jr., who won in 1994, 1998 and 1999, is the only other player who has won the competition more than once. Yes, they apparently keep records of this stuff.

Fielder slugged a total of 28 homers on the night, including five in the first round, 11 in the second round and 12 in the finals. Plenty of fountain splashes were had. Fielder’s 12 homers in the final round actually tied Robinson Cano’s final-round record from last year. He also had the longest blast of the night, checking in at 476 feet.

Bautista, who advanced by defeating Mark Trumbo in a swing-off, managed seven homers in the finals. He had 20 overall, including a first-round best of 11.

The National League was suffering from a serious lack of Giancarlo Stanton and it showed in the final tally, as they were crushed 61-21. NL captain Matt Kemp hit one only home run while Carlos Beltran was the only member of the squad to advance to the second round.

While the AL cruised to victory, they didn’t get any help from their captain Cano. He ended up with a goose egg, much to the delight of the Kauffman Stadium faithful. You see, the home crowd was upset that Cano didn’t pick Billy Butler for his squad. And they really let him have it. Almost uncomfortably so.

This is actually the second straight year that the home fans booed one of the Home Run Derby participants, as the Fielder was jeered by the Chase Field crowd last year for not picking Justin Upton. Next year the All-Star Game takes place at Citi Field, so expect lots of disappointment when Mike Nickeas isn’t chosen to participate.

Let’s end spring training now, you guys

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There’s a saying that goes “nothing good ever happens after 2AM.” It can also be said that nothing good ever happens after, say, week 5 or 6 of spring training.

Today, for instance, are a lot of inconsequential games. Those are neutral. Then there are a rash of these sorts of incidents which just went down today, all of which are bad:

Archer seems to be OK for now. Moncada walked off his thing and went back into the game. We’re still waiting to hear on Bumgarner and Ichiro. If there is anything serious with them we’ll update as we learn things.

But really, guys: Spring Training is too long. Even in a year like this one, when it’s a tad shorter than usual because of an early start to the regular season. Everyone who was gonna get their timing down well enough to make a big league roster has already done so. If someone isn’t healthy and in playing shape now, they’re not gonna be six days from now for Opening Day. The cake, as they say, is baked.

All that can happen is possessed-by-the-devil baseballs attacking unsuspecting players and injuring them in meaningless exhibitions. Let’s cease all baseball now until the regular season starts. Out of an abundance of caution.