Royals want a player, not a prospect, for Jonathan Broxton

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That according to FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi:

Broxton, who was signed to set up Joakim Soria this season, has a 1.99 ERA and 21 saves in 24 opportunities as Kansas City’s closer. Still, the Royals would likely be OK without him, as they’d still have some combination of Greg Holland, Aaron Crow and Tim Collins to pitch the final two or three innings.

It’s a given that if the Royals want a major leaguer for Broxton then they’re looking to upgrade their rotation. But the list of contenders that would spare a starter in return for a closer isn’t long, if it exists at all. With Roy Halladay on the way back, the Phillies might be open to trading Joe Blanton to bring in Broxton as an eighth-inning guy, but that’s not the kind of guy the Royals are looking for.

The best possibility I can see is with the Mets. They could send Dillon Gee to Kansas City for Broxton and then call up Matt Harvey to take his rotation spot. Still, I don’t think I’d make that trade if I were the Mets. A half-season of Broxton isn’t worth 4 1/2 of Gee. Maybe if the Royals included Jose Mijares as well, giving the Mets two bullpen upgrades.

Still, my guess is that when Broxton goes — and it probably is a matter of when — it’s simply for a prospect or two. The Royals aren’t completely out of the mix in the weak AL Central, but they’re also not really a fourth starter away from becoming a contender.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.