And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Mets 6, Phillies 5: The R.A. Dickey vs. Cole Hamels matchup didn’t pan out as some expected, but David Wright took care of things, going 3 for 5 with four RBI including the game winner.

Cardinals 6, Rockies 2: Lance Lynn had been skidding but the Rockies cured his ills. The Rockies cure everyone’s ills. Six shutout innings for Lynn and his 11th win.

Braves 7, Cubs 3: Brian McCann and Jason Heyward homer, helping the Braves salvage the split. I think if they dropped this one I would have launched my annual “teams I’d root for if I didn’t root for the Braves” post, but they’ve got a reprieve.

Pirates 2, Astros 0: You can say the Pirates recent hot streak is courtesy of playing four games against the Rockies. Or you can say that they’re a team winning the games they’re supposed to win. Doesn’t matter: they’re still in first place. Jeff Karstens threw eight shutout innings fanning eight.

Royals 9, Blue Jays 6: Eric Hosmer had three RBI and Luke Hochevar pitched well but had to leave early due to sprained ankle he sustained while covering first base. That’s it. Tomorrow, pitcher fielding practice for everyone. Oh, wait, no. None of that. That’s how Hochevar got hurt in the first place.

Dodgers 4, Diamondbacks 1: Is it bad that I had never heard of Nate Eovaldi before I read this box score? Hell, I can’t know everything. He won for the Dodgers, though, giving up one run in six innings.

Indians 3, Rays 1: Tampa Bay continues to slide. They’ve lost eight of ten. The Indians have won six of eight. And yes, these are bogus uneven data sets. Do what I wanna do.

Nationals 6, Giants 5: The Nats win on a walkoff … um, botched double play. Adam LaRoche should have been out and the game should have headed to extras when he hit a bases loaded one out grounder to short in the ninth. But Brandon Crawford threw low to first, LaRoche was safe, the run scored and the Nats had a sweep of the Giants.

Marlins 4, Brewers 0: Mark Buehrle threw seven and two-thirds shutout innings and Carlos Lee went 2 for 4 in his Miami debut.

White Sox 2, Rangers 1: Kevin Youkilis hit the go-ahead homer in the sixth. That trade is working out so far.

Tigers 7, Twins 3: A three-run homer in the eighth inning by Prince Fielder broke a tie that probably shouldn’t have been tie, except for the fact that the Twins couldn’t score despite having a boatload of base runners. Or, as my son calls it, a buttload. Either way, really.

Padres 2, Reds 1: Six straight wins for San Diego, and eight of 11, this one via a Evereth Cabrera bases loaded single in the bottom of the ninth. The game featured a matchup of pitchers in that big offseason trade: Mat Latos vs. Edinson Volquez. Both of them pitched fantastically.

Angels 9, Orioles 7: Garrett Richards and Jake Arrieta were each pretty dreadful and each were optioned back to Triple-A after the game. You don’t see that every day.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

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It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

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The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.