Roger Clemens is not naive

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At least that’s what his lawyer says:

Clemens adamantly denied using either substance at a 2008 congressional hearing and added that “no matter what we discuss here today, I’m never going to have my name restored.”

Hardin said that’s still the case.

“Roger is not naive,” Hardin said in a telephone interview this week. “I was saying that if 85 percent thought he was guilty before, then this verdict might move the needle to 50 percent.”

Kind of beside the point, I reckon. People who think he did PEDs and care will always think so and always hold it against him. People who think he did PEDs and don’t care won’t ever care. People who don’t think he did PEDs, well, I have yet to meet one who truly thinks that, but their mind probably won’t be changed either.

Fact is, PED-thinking is more like religion than anything else. People believe what they want to believe, and when the beliefs are challenged, they say it doesn’t matter. It’s the downside of baseball and baseball players being treated like heroes and mythological figures for over a century. There’s no room for them to be human, flawed or, in some cases, gifted, without people getting bent out of shape about it.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.