Bobby V.-produced documentary has MLB a bit cranky

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There’s a new documentary coming out about the development, scouting and signing — and the excesses, pressures and manipulations — of free agent signings in the Dominican Republic. It contains hidden camera footage of Miguel Sano’s signing in 2009 and lots of other things Major League Baseball is not exactly happy with or proud of.

Ken Davidoff has a writeup about it in the Post, and the most fun part about it is that Bobby Valentine is a producer of the flick. Despite the fact that Major League Baseball is not happy with it because they claim it presents a distorted picture of what really goes on down there, Bobby V. stands behind it:

To Valentine, Muscato and the filmmakers, the film is more about the stories of two young men and their aspiration than an exposé of MLB’s role in the Dominican. And though Valentine is now back inside baseball, he said he has no regrets about committing to the project.

“I wasn’t going to stand in the way of the investors and of young producers making a living,” Valentine said. “If these were actors, then you’ve got to change the script. But it’s a documentary. You don’t do it if you don’t want it to be what’s real.”

Probably worth noting that, despite MLB’s protests, the filmmakers say that people from the MLB Investigations Office declined to be interviewed for the film.

Definitely sounds like it’s worth a view when it’s available.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.