Selection Sunday: Your 2012 All-Star rosters are revealed…

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Major League Baseball is announcing the All-Star rosters for each league this afternoon during an hour-long special on TBS. We’ll update this post as the names come in:

The 2012 MLB All-Star Game is next Tuesday, July 10, at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Starters

C Mike Napoli
1B Prince Fielder
2B Robinson Cano
3B Adrian Beltre
SS Derek Jeter
OF Josh Hamilton
OF Curtis Granderson
OF Jose Bautista
DH David Ortiz

Pitching Staff

LHP Matt Harrison
RHP Felix Hernandez
RHP Justin Verlander
LHP CC Sabathia
LHP C.J. Wilson
RHP Jered Weaver
LHP Chris Sale
LHP David Price
RHP Joe Nathan
RHP Ryan Cook
RHP Jim Johnson
RHP Chris Perez
RHP Fernando Rodney

Reserves

OF Adam Jones
C Matt Wieters
DH Adam Dunn
1B Paul Konerko
SS Asdrubal Cabrera
3B Miguel Cabrera
DH Billy Butler
OF Mike Trout
OF Mark Trumbo
C Joe Mauer
SS Elvis Andrus
2B Ian Kinsler

*******

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Starters

C Buster Posey
1B Joey Votto
2B Dan Uggla
3B Pablo Sandoval
SS Rafael Furcal
OF Matt Kemp
OF Carlos Beltran
OF Melky Cabrera

Pitching Staff

RHP Clayton Kershaw
LHP Gio Gonzalez
RHP Stephen Strasburg
LHP Cole Hamels
LHP Wade Miley
RHP R.A. Dickey
RHP Lance Lynn
RHP Matt Cain
RHP Craig Kimbrel
LHP Aroldis Chapman
RHP Jonathan Papelbon
RHP Joel Hanrahan
RHP Huston Street

Reserves

SS Starlin Castro
1B Bryan LaHair
OF Jay Bruce
OF Carlos Gonzalez
2B Jose Altuve
OF Giancarlo Stanton
OF Ryan Braun
3B David Wright
C Carlos Ruiz
OF Andrew McCutchen
C Yadier Molina
SS Ian Desmond

Justin Turner is a postseason monster

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A not-insignificant amount of the Dodgers’ success in recent years has to do with the emergence of Justin Turner. In his first five seasons with the Orioles and Mets, he was a forgettable infielder who had versatility, but no power. The Mets non-tendered him after the 2013 season, a move they now really regret.

In four regular seasons since, as a Dodger, Turner has hit an aggregate .303/.378/.502. His 162-game averages over those four seasons: 23 home runs, 36 doubles, 83 RBI, 80 runs scored. And he’s also a pretty good third baseman, it turns out. The Dodgers have averaged 95 wins per season over the past four years.

Turner, 32, has gotten better and better with each passing year. This year, he drew more walks (59) than strikeouts (56), a club only five other players (min. 300 PA) belonged to, and he trailed only Joey Votto (1.61) in BB/K ratio (1.05). He zoomed past his previous career-high in OPS, finishing at .945. His .415 on-base percentage was fourth-best in baseball. His batting average was fifth-best and only nine points behind NL batting champion Charlie Blackmon.

It doesn’t seem possible, but Turner has been even better in the postseason. He exemplified that with his walk-off home run to win Game 2 of the NLCS against the Cubs. Overall, entering Wednesday night’s action, he was batting .363/.474/.613 in 97 postseason plate appearances. In Game 4, he went 2-for-2 with two walks, a single, and a solo home run. That increases his postseason slash line to .378/.495/.659, now across 101 plate appearances. That’s a 1.154 OPS. The career-high regular season OPS for future first-ballot Hall of Famer Albert Pujols was 1.114 in 2008, when he won his third career MVP Award. Statistically, in the postseason, Turner hits slightly better than Pujols did in the prime of his career. Of course, we should adjust for leagues and parks and all that, but to even be in that neighborhood is incredible.

In the age of stats, the concept of “clutch” has rightfully eroded. We don’t really allow players to ascend to godlike levels anymore like the way we did Derek Jeter, for instance. (Jeter’s career OPS in the playoffs, by the way, was a comparatively pitiful .838.) Turner isn’t clutch; he’s just a damn good hitter whose careful approach at the plate has allowed him to shine in the postseason and the Dodgers can’t imagine life without him.