Andrew McCutchen OK after leaving game with wrist soreness

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UPDATE: McCutchen told Sanserino after the game that he doesn’t anticipate missing any time.

5:30 PM: Cross your fingers, Pirates fans.

According to Michael Sanserino of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Andrew McCutchen left this afternoon’s game against the Cardinals due to soreness in his left wrist.

McCutchen injured the wrist while making a diving catch to rob Carlos Beltran of a hit in the bottom of the third inning. He stayed in the game initially, taking two more at-bats, but was replaced in center field by Alex Presley in the bottom of the seventh inning. He’s currently being treated and evaluated, after which the Pirates will announce an update on his status.

McCutchen went 2-for-4 with a run scored this afternoon and is hitting .346/.401/.593 with 15 homers, 51 RBI, 14 stolen bases and a .993 OPS through 74 games this season. It goes without saying, but the Pirates would have a really tough time staying afloat in the playoff race if he requires an extended absence.

Braves release James Loney

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Just a few days after inking him to a minor league deal, the Braves have released first baseman James Loney, the team announced on Monday. Loney became expendable when the Braves acquired Matt Adams from the Cardinals on Saturday as a replacement for the injured Freddie Freeman.

Loney, 33, appeared in two games at Triple-A Gwinnett. He had one hit, a single, and one walk in eight plate appearances.

Loney will likely have to wait for another team to deal with an injured first baseman or DH before he can secure another contract.

Ian Kinsler lists the five toughest pitchers in the AL Central

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Every now and then, The Players’ Tribune runs a “five toughest” feature. In 2015, David Ortiz listed the five toughest pitchers he ever faced. Last month, Christian Yelich wrote up the five toughest pitchers in the NL East. Now, it’s Ian Kinsler‘s turn with the five toughest pitchers in the AL Central.

Kinsler goes into detail explaining why each pitcher is difficult to face, so hop over to The Players’ Tribune for his reasoning. His list

Presumably, Kinsler intentionally omitted his Tiger teammates from the list. He has faced Justin Verlander a fair amount earlier in his career, and he has only a .176/.333/.235 batting line in 42 plate appearances against the right-hander. Verlander’s stuff is often described as tough to hit in one phrase or another. Kinsler has also struggled against Indians starter Carlos Carrasco (.590 OPS), but one can understand why he would be omitted from a list of five given who was already listed.