Twins open to trading Denard Span, not Josh Willingham

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The Twins lost 99 games last year. This year, they’re on pace to lose 96. Their minor league system boasts one potential star in Miguel Sano but is otherwise probably among the weakest in the game. Maybe cashing in the 33-year-old outfielder with a history of back problems wouldn’t be such a bad idea?

According to Jon Heyman of CBS Sports, the Twins aren’t listening on Josh Willingham, though. They will consider moving Denard Span, who is five years younger but who could be replaced in center field by Ben Revere.

Given their place in the standings, the Twins really should be open to moving anyone. No one is going to make a big offer for Joe Mauer’s huge contract, so he stays. However, everyone else — Justin Morneau included — should be able to be had.

Willingham has been outstanding with his .272/.384/.535 line and 49 RBI this year, and given that he’s just in the first year of a three-year, $21 million contract, it’s understandable that the Twins wouldn’t want to part with him. Still, his value probably won’t ever be higher, and it’s doubtful the Twins are going to win with him next year. By the time 2014 rolls around, Willingham will be 35 and probably won’t be the same player. If they can get two quality prospects for him now, they should pull the trigger.

Span is hitting .277/.341/.396 this season, which should give his trade value a modest boost. The Nationals have often been mentioned in connection with him, and a deal involving him and closer Drew Storen was discussed last year. The Twins still might be interested in such a trade once Storen returns from minor elbow surgery next month. The Marlins are another team that could pursue Span.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: