betances reuters

Yankees demote Dellin Betances from Triple-A to Double-A

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Yankees prospect Dellin Betances had a 3.70 ERA and struck out 142 batters in 126 1/3 innings last season in the minors and ranked 63rd on Baseball America‘s Top 100 prospects list this past winter.

But his rise has suddenly stalled here in 2012.

As first reported by Trentonian beat writer Josh Norris, Betances, 24, was sent from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to Double-A Trenton on Wednesday after registering a 6.39 ERA and 1.88 WHIP over 74 2/3 frames in the International League. His strikeout rate has tanked (8.6 K/9) and he’s struggled mightily with his control (69 walks).

The Yanks will hope that the Brooklyn native can get back on track against a lower level of competition.

David Ross to compete on “Dancing with the Stars”

David Ross
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Do you miss David Ross? I miss David Ross. The season hasn’t even started yet and I miss David Ross. There’s something comforting about having a likable graybeard catcher in the game with bonus points for being bald. His loss will be felt.

But while we won’t have David Ross in baseball all this year — at least on the field; he’s a special assistant with the Cubs — we’ll still have David Ross someplace:

Johnny Damon did “Celebrity Apprentice” — Trump fired him, sadly — but we’ve never had a ballplayer on “Dancing With The Stars.” There have been several football players and some Olympians, but no baseball guys. Which makes some amount of sense as, outside of the middle infielders and first basemen, footwork isn’t necessarily the most important tool.

Catchers are particularly plodding for athletes, so good luck, David. Unless you have some moves you haven’t flashed in the past, you’ll probably need it.

Baseball players are, generally, “sticking to sports”

ANAHEIM, CA - JUNE 25:  Sean Doolittle #62 of the Oakland Athletics pitches during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on June 25, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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Jayson Stark has an interesting article up over at ESPN talking about how baseball players are not talking about politics these days. The upshot: while people in general seem somewhat consumed with politics lately and while basketball players and coaches have not hesitated to talk about the unique and extraordinarily interesting state of U.S. affairs, baseball players are, well, sticking to baseball:

Welcome to baseball in 2017, a year like no other in our nation. In the NBA, coaches and stars take regular aim at the policies of the new president of the United States, from the executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries to plans for building a massive wall along the Mexican border. But in Major League Baseball — where locker rooms feature a multicultural melting pot of athletes, many of whom could be directly or indirectly affected by those policies — what you hear (or don’t hear) is the careful sound of political silence.

Stark notes a couple of exceptions — Sean Doolittle of the Athletics is one — and talks to a lot of people around the game and speculates why most do not. And like I said, it’s interesting. But I don’t think it’s a huge mystery, either.

All athletes, entertainers and anyone else who relies on the public for their well-being have an incentive not to aggravate their audience. As Michael Jordan once famously said, Republicans buy sneakers too, so why would anyone want to go out of their way to alienate them? Yet, as Stark notes, many in the NBA — and in Hollywood and other public-facing businesses — have been outspoken about politics in recent months. I suspect it’s because things are so crazy right now that the usual incentives to keep one’s head down are simply not strong enough.

In baseball, however, there is a difference: the code of the clubhouse and clubhouse cohesion. Separate and apart from what fans might think, baseball players are far more preoccupied with not rocking the boat internally. Of making themselves the center of attention or of putting their teammates in a position where they’ll be asked hard questions. While this dynamic exists in all sports to some degree, I don’t think it’s unfair to say it’s exponentially more prevalent in baseball. They’re in that clubhouse far more often than NBA players are in their locker room and the basic culture of the game strongly encourages a certain sort of conformity. Not a conformity of ideas, mind you — guys think all manner of different things — but conformity of decorum. A ballplayer in 2017 simply has no strong incentive to take a singular stand and many incentives not to.

You may think, given that I tend to be politically outspoken around here and on social media, that I have a problem with this. I don’t, really. People all operate within systems and communities and I’d never suggest that a ballplayer speak up about something simply for the sake of speaking up about it. They have their business and futures and family to take care of and no one is in any position to judge them for taking the course they choose to take.

But it does not mean, of course, that we should not pay attention when a player does decide to speak up, no matter the manner in which he does. Indeed, given all of the forces which caution baseball players from speaking out, when one does it is truly notable. It probably means he feels extraordinarily strongly about the matter on which he speaks. It means that we should probably listen to them and ask why they have been compelled to take the step they did and what it is, exactly, they’re trying to say. Whether we agree with the sentiment or not.