Trevor Bauer shaky in major league debut

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The Trevor Bauer experience got off to a bit of a shaky start tonight in Atlanta. In the most hyped debut for a starting pitcher since Yu Darvish in April, the 2011 No. 3 overall pick allowed two runs over four innings as part of a no-decision against the Braves.

Bauer struck out Michael Bourn looking on a 3-2 pitch to begin his major league career and was able to get out of the first inning unscathed after giving up a two-out single to Martin Prado. The Braves threatened in the second inning after Chipper Jones singled and Freddie Freeman doubled, but the 21-year-old right-hander was able to get Andrelton Simmons on a ground out and Jair Jurrjens to strike out to escape.

Things got pretty dicey in a 30-pitch third inning. He walked three, hit a batter and gave up an RBI double to Brian McCann. The inning even included a visit from the team trainer, but the rookie right-hander checked out OK. He was pretty fortunate to get out of it with just one run crossing the plate. Bauer gave up a sacrifice fly in his final inning of work before Gerardo Parra pinch-hit for him with two outs in the top of the fifth.

All told, Bauer allowed five hits while walking three, striking out three and hitting a batter. He threw 42 out of 74 pitches for strikes. It’s worth noting that he threw 50 pitches Sunday during his final start with Triple-A Reno, so the Diamondbacks likely planned to have a quick hook all along.

It was a pretty uneven debut for Bauer, but it’s easy to see why he has garnered so much attention. While he didn’t have his best curveball working, he was hitting 95 mph with his fastball and showcased his wide assortment of pitches. He’ll be a lot of fun to watch moving forward.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.