More people pile on Clay Buchholz

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Add Eric Wilbur*  to the list of people who think that attending an event to aid families struck by tragedy, when said event does not conflict with any doctor’s orders and is totally cool as far as the team is concerned, is “immature”:

Buchholz did not drink at the charity event, which also featured a golf outing hosted by WAAF’s Greg Hill, but his appearance still speaks volumes about the pitcher’s immaturity and lack of perception.

Wilbur wrote that before being informed that Red Sox doctors cleared it. Then, after being informed of this, Wilbur says that makes it even dumber, somehow. He then offers this doozy:

I get it. It sounds malevolent to complain about a guy attending something for charity, and if he didn’t drink, what’s the big deal? Good for Buchholz for showing his support.

But what an idiot.

He goes on to imply that Buchholz’s immaturity (or something of his own doing) is what landed him in the hospital in the first place:

Mind you, had Buchholz not swallowed chewing tobacco, taken too many Alleves, or whatever caused his bout of esophagitis, he was supposed to be on a Western-bound plane following yesterday’s 10-4 win over the Blue Jays.

I have no idea what caused Buchholz’s medical condition. It may very well have been something he did. But I’m also pretty sure that Dr. Wilbur here doesn’t know either. Not that that’s gonna stop him.

My favorite part is the “lack of perception” idea Wilbur puts in here. Like, it’s not a problem, except for the way it’s going to be perceived.

Well, given that it’s people with absolutely no perspective about things that truly matter in the world — people like the radio idiots who blew this up this morning and Wilbur here who is running with it — who are perceiving it, I sincerely hope Buchholz refuses to give a single crap about what they’re saying.

*UPDATE: I had originally referred to this as a Boston Globe article. It’s not. Wilbur is not a Boston Globe staff person. He writes a fan blog which is hosted by Boston.com, which is also the web home of the Globe.

Hideki Matsui thinks Shohei Otani should pitch and hit in MLB

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Yankees’ special advisor and former outfielder Hideki Matsui expects to help the club “convince or recruit” Japanese two-way star Shohei Otani, according to a report from MLB.com’s Deesha Thosar. The Yankees are currently viewed as the favorites to sign Otani, though there still figures to be plenty of competition for his services when he finally becomes eligible to enter Major League Baseball.

Matsui also told Thosar that while he hasn’t seen a player find success as a hybrid pitcher/slugger in the majors, he’s taken notice of Otani’s success in both areas. “He’s done well in Japan, so as a baseball fan I’m looking forward to how he’s going to do here in the Majors and in the U.S.,” Matsui said, later adding, “If [pitching and hitting is] something he wants to do, and the team wants it, then why not?”

Neither the Yankees nor any other suitor should be too concerned with Otani’s ability to translate his .332 batting average and 3.20 ERA to MLB — at least, not just yet. There are still a few roadblocks in his path to the major leagues, most notably the lack of approval from the Players Association. Per FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman, the union doesn’t want to sign off on an agreement that would give the Nippon Ham Fighters a $20 million posting fee in exchange for Otani’s services. According to the posting system rules, Otani himself would be eligible to receive no more than a $4 million signing bonus.

The good news in all of this? The union agreed to reach a final decision by Monday, November 21, so there’s still a chance Major League Baseball will see the talented two-way player bring his unique skillset to the field in 2018.