Mets tie a major league record in 17-1 drubbing of Cubs

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The game started off quietly enough, with the Mets and Cubs tied at 1 after three innings. It didn’t stay that way, though: the Mets exploded for 15 runs between the fourth and sixth innings in routing the Cubs 17-1 on Wednesday.

David Wright, Ike Davis, Scott Hairston and Daniel Murphy combined to drive in all of the runs for the Mets, with Wright knocking in five and the other three plating four apiece. The Mets were the first team since the 2007 Rangers and just the fourth since 1918 to have four players each with four RBI in a game.

Those 2007 Rangers did it in the memorable 30-3 win over the Orioles in the first game of a doubleheader on Aug. 22. Marlon Byrd, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Ramon Vazquez and Travis Metcalf all had four RBI in that one, with Salty and Vazquez knocking in seven runs apiece. Metcalf did it one swing, delivering a grand slam in his lone at-bat off the bench.

The Mets also got a grand slam today, that from Hairston. Murphy got three of his four RBI on his first two homers of the season. Davis homered and doubled twice to raise his average above .200 for the first time all year. Wright knocked in five runs with a sac fly, a double and a single and then got the final three innings off, costing him two at-bats.

The other teams with four four-RBI players: the 1953 Braves (Johnny Logan, Eddie Mathews, Jim Pendleton and Jack Dittmer in a 19-4 win over the Pirates) and the 1979 Phillies (Pete Rose, Mike Schmidt, Garry Maddox and Bob Boone in a 23-22 win over the Cubs).

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.