Astros going with a six-man rotation for a while

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Houston manager Brad Mills has decided to go with a six-man rotation through the All-Star break.  The reason? Bud Norris is coming back and the Astros are so happy with the guy who has been replacing him — Dallas Keuchel — that they don’t want to send him back down.

Eh, their call, but it’s not like Keuchel seems worth the fuss. He’s pitched superficially well in his brief stint, posting a 1.29 ERA in a couple of starts, but it’s a little misleading. He has 14 innings and in that time has only struck out five dudes while walking five. His k-rate has been fairly unremarkable in the minors too, and he’s mostly seen success when repeating a level, which is the sign of a guy who isn’t a stud prospect.

But hey, why not? The Astros aren’t going anywhere. If they want to take a closer look at Keuchel for a couple of weeks while giving some of the other starters a break, no biggie.

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.