Orioles release Miguel Tejada from Triple-A at his request

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According to Dan Connolly of the Baltimore Sun the Orioles have released Miguel Tejada from their Triple-A team at the former MVP’s request.

Tejada had been playing third base for Norfolk since mid-May, but hit just .259 with zero homers and a .296 slugging percentage in 36 games. Over the weekend Norfolk also released Jamie Moyer.

Considering he’s 38 years old and was terrible in 91 games for the Giants last season this seems like the end of the line for Tejada, who won the MVP in 2002 and made six All-Star teams while ranking as one of the best-hitting shortstops of all time.

If he’s indeed done, Tejada finishes as a career .285 hitter with 304 homers and a .793 OPS in 2,118 games and 15 seasons. Among all players in baseball history to log at least two-thirds of their games as a shortstop Tejada ranks 20th in Wins Above Replacement and trails only Derek Jeter, Cal Ripken Jr., and Barry Larkin during the past 25 years.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.