Charlie Manuel is not particularly interested in hearing you second guess him

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The Phillies had a rough day yesterday. So you can understand that Charlie Manuel was not particularly interested in answering questions about his crappy bullpen. Specifically the bullpen that gave up the 1-0 lead when Antonio Bastardo walked two dudes and gave up a three-run bomb to Carlos Pena.

Someone asked Manuel why Bastardo came in the game in the eighth inning. Manuel explained that Hamels had already thrown 111 pitches, it was hot, it was the eighth inning and how the fates and Ruben Amaro had aligned the world in such a way that Bastardo is the Phillies’ eighth inning guy.  Then he said

“You guys ought to sit in the dugout with me during the game and give me all the scenarios because I don’t think we know them,” Manuel said sarcastically. “We don’t know how to manage a game. Really, you guys ought to sit down there with us or tweet or something and float the information down there to me because I’m not smart enough to get it.”

I’d love to see a Twitter-sourced baseball game in which the manager does whatever his tweeps tell him to do. Maybe some of the matchups would work out better. And maybe Manuel would know who’s having a bad day at work, who can’t get some pop song out of their head, who’s watching that week’s “Mad Men” and what everybody’s beer status was.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.