Are the Cubs doing too much non-baseball stuff at Wrigley Field?


Gordon Wittenmyer of the Sun Times makes the case that, after a homestand which saw spray-painted outfield grass thanks to multiple rock concerts at Wrigley Field, the Cubs’ management’s priorities are out of whack:

Players were diplomatic about the grotesque look of the field during that homestand and the perception that the use of the ballpark for every possible concert and paid yoga gathering looks more important than the baseball to the top business brass.

That’s right, yoga. Even as the rushed repairs to the Wrigley sod were struggling to take root, a photo was tweeted Sunday of what looked like hundreds of women stretching on yoga mats spread across the outfield grass.

It doesn’t help that the baseball brass has assembled the worst team in the majors to date.

There’s an element of classic false dichotomy here in that it certainly does not follow that a team trying to get extra revenue via non-baseball events is necessarily neglecting the team’s baseball needs.  Letting some bands play in Wrigley is not going to unduly harm a massive rebuilding project.

But even if Wittnmyer’s criticism is a bit overheated, it is true that allowing the grass at Wrigley to get messed up is poor form. Cubs fans have very little to cheer for at the moment. They should at least be able to go to a game and see a nice field.

David Phelps to undergo Tommy John surgery

Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Pitcher David Phelps has a torn UCL and will undergo Tommy John surgery, ending his 2018 season, the Mariners announced on Wednesday. Phelps was making brief one-inning stints in the Cactus League as he worked his way back from a procedure to remove a bone spur from his elbow last September. He said he felt the ligament tear on his final pitch against the Angels in his March 17 appearance.

Phelps, 31, was expected to set up for closer Edwin Diaz. The right-hander, between the Marlins and Mariners last season, posted a 3.40 ERA with a 62/26 K/BB ratio in 55 2/3 innings. He and the Mariners avoided arbitration in January, agreeing on a $5.55 million salary for the 2018 campaign. Phelps will become eligible to become a free agent at the end of the season.

As the Mariners noted in their statement, the expected recovery period for Tommy John surgery is 12-15 months, so this very likely cuts into Phelps’ 2019 season as well.