Derek Norris makes first career homer a walkoff blast

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The A’s were dealt a couple of very tough losses in the first two games against the Giants. On Friday, Ryan Cook, who entered with an 0.57 ERA, gave up four runs in the ninth to take a blown save and a loss. On Saturday, the A’s rallied for four runs in the ninth, only to come up just short and lose 9-8.

Today, the A’s finally got it done, all thanks to Derek Norris’ first major league homer.

Norris delivered a three-run shot in the bottom of the ninth off Santiago Casilla, giving the A’s a 4-2 victory. It was just the second blown save in 22 opportunities for Casilla.

Norris was called up last week to share time with the struggling Kurt Suzuki behind the plate for Oakland. Today’s start was his third as a big leaguer, but he already has more RBI (four) than Suzuki does in the last month (three).

The A’s comeback ruined Matt Cain’s streak of victories in eight straight starts. No one else has won more than six consecutive starts this season, though R.A. Dickey will go for No. 7 tonight. Cain didn’t figure in the decision, obviously, but this marked the first time since May 1 than the Giants had lost one of his starts.

 

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.