Joe Saunders scratched from start last night after having trouble getting loose

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Is Trevor Bauer time upon us? Maybe.

According to Steve Gilbert of MLB.com, Joe Saunders was scratched from his scheduled start last night against the Cubs because he had trouble getting loose. Josh Collmenter got the call at the last minute and allowed one run over four innings. Brad Ziegler, Craig Breslow, Bryan Shaw and David Hernandez then combined for five shutout frames to lock down the 9-1 victory.

Saunders downplayed the severity of the situation after the game, but we should know more on his status in the next few days.

“It was just one of those weird fluke things where I just couldn’t get loose,” Saunders said. “Maybe I slept on it wrong or something like that. I felt great my last outing, felt great in my bullpen session on Wednesday, so I think this is just kind of a fluke thing. Strength-wise [the training staff] said I was off the charts, so I’m not worried about anything structurally.”

Saunders, 31, has a 3.44 ERA and 53/21 K/BB ratio in 81 innings over his first 13 starts this season. He’s been the subject of trade rumors recently, as the Diamondbacks consider ways to make room for Bauer in the starting rotation. The 2011 first-round pick has a 2.79 ERA and 51 strikeouts in 42 innings since being promoted to Triple-A Reno last month.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.