Mets closer Frank Francisco on the Yankees: “I can’t wait to face those chickens”

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I’m not sure what could possibly compel a struggling second-rate closer with a 5.14 ERA to talk trash publicly against the Yankees, but Mets right-hander Frank Francisco took the media bait and did just that.

With this weekend’s Subway Series starting at Citi Field tonight, Francisco was asked for his thoughts about facing the Yankees and told Mike Puma of the New York Post:

I can’t wait to face those chickens. I want to strike out the side against them. I’ve done it before.

And then according to Puma he perhaps had a brief moment of self-awareness and said: “I think I’ve said too much already.”

Francisco spent the first seven years of his career in the American League before signing a two-year, $12 million deal with the Mets as a free agent this offseason, so he’s indeed faced “those chickens” plenty before. And he’s pitched pretty damn well too, posting a 3.29 ERA, .229 opponents’ batting average, and 24/10 K/BB ratio in 27 career appearances versus the Yankees.

Puma even looked back at the game logs and found that, sure enough, Francisco struck out the side against the Yankees on May 21, 2004, whiffing Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, and Jason Giambi in order. So, you know, that totally gives him the upper hand this weekend. Or something.

As you’d expect none of Francisco’s teammates were dumb enough to take the same bait, especially after the Yankees swept the Mets at Yankee Stadium just two weeks ago.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.