Drew Hutchison avoids surgery on elbow, shut down for 4-6 weeks

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Here’s some good news for the injury-riddled Blue Jays.

According to Richard Griffin of the Toronto Star, Blue Jays general manager Alex Anthopoulos said this afternoon that Drew Hutchison will not require Tommy John surgery. Hutchison was recently diagnosed with a sprained ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow, but he will be shut down for 4-6 weeks before resuming a throwing program.

There’s always the chance of a setback which would necessitate surgery, but Hutchison could rejoin the Jays later this season if the rehab process goes well. The 21-year-old right-hander made his major league debut two months ago and posted a 4.60 ERA and 49/20 K/BB ratio in 58 2/3 innings prior to the injury.

The Blue Jays are also missing Brandon Morrow and Kyle Drabek at the moment, so they have their work cut out for them in order to stay afloat in the playoff race. Jesse Chavez, who gave up four runs in 2 2/3 innings Tuesday against the Brewers, is being asked to make another start Sunday against the Marlins while Aaron Laffey will join the rotation to start Tuesday against the Red Sox.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.