Scott Feldman on demotion to bullpen: “I’m not happy”

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Scott Feldman began the season as a long reliever, shifted to starting again when injuries struck the Rangers’ rotation, and is now headed back to the bullpen thanks to Roy Oswalt’s impending arrival.

And he’s not happy about the constantly changing role, telling Sarah Trotto of ESPN Dallas:

It’s just tough to keep going back and forth. That’s the main thing. Moving back and forth, it’s how you hurt your arm. It’s how you get hurt. I’m not happy. Basically, telling me that I’m not in the plans for the second time this year, spring training and then now, that’s fine, if I’m not in their plans. But it doesn’t mean I have to be happy about it.

There’s certainly some truth behind what Feldman is saying, but he’s the one who blew a chance to remain in the rotation by going 1-6 with a 6.43 ERA in eight starts. Had he gone 6-1 with a 3.43 ERA or even 3-4 with a 4.43 ERA the Rangers likely would be sticking with him as a starter instead of choosing to keep Double-A call-up Justin Grimm in the rotation alongside Oswalt instead.

Dating back to the beginning of 2010 he has a 10-18 record and 5.35 ERA in 215 total innings, which leaves Feldman little room to complain about much of anything and little reason to criticize the Rangers for treating him like someone no longer in their long-term plans. He’s only on the team because of a two-year, $11.5 million contract extension signed coming off a career-year in 2009. The Rangers are probably “not happy” with how things have gone since then either.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.