Ichiro Suzuki set for 2,500th hit; will he get to 3,000?

25 Comments

Probably tonight or perhaps tomorrow, Ichiro Suzuki will get his 2,500th hit as a major leaguer. He’s currently just one away, though that was also the case a couple of days ago; Ichiro  went 0-for-4 on Sunday and was given a rare day off on Monday.

Obviously, Ichiro’s pace is slowing down. The hope was his down 2011 season was just an aberration, but after 67 games in 2012, the 38-year-old is sporting the same .645 OPS he finished 2011 with.

It also looks like he’ll finish well shy of 200 hits once again. He’s at 71 through the Mariners’ first 69 games, putting him on pace to finish at 167.

Through 10 big-league seasons, Ichiro never finished with fewer than 208 hits. He peaked at 262 in 2004. However, he slipped to 184 last year, even though he played in 161 games.

If Ichiro finishes with 167 hits this season, it means he’ll enter 2013 with 2,595 hits. Barring a sudden resurgence at ages 39 and 40, he’ll have to play regularly into 2015 in order to reach 3,000. He’ll be 41 then, and chances are he’ll be a real liability as a starting outfielder. There’s a real threat that no one is going to want him, at least not as a starter. His five-year, $90 million contract with the Mariners expires at the end of this season, and with the way things are looking now, the team might opt to move on.

So, maybe Ichiro will simply pack it in before he gets to 3,000. It’s not like his legacy is in doubt. One can argue whether a singles-hitting right fielder such as Ichiro belongs in the Hall of Fame, but there’s no doubt he’s getting in. He’s a legend regardless of whether he finishes his MLB career with 3,000 hits. In truth, he already has 3,777 anyway, adding in his remarkable numbers from Japan. He doesn’t have anything left to prove.

David DeJesus retires

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

Rich Schultz/Getty Images
4 Comments

Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.