Carlos Gonzalez

The Rockies should trade Carlos Gonzalez?


That’s the thinking of New York Post columnist Joel Sherman. His belief: the Rockies might be better off having more young parts than having the duo of Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez tied up at $36 million-$40 million from 2015-17.

Personally, I’m not sold.

For one thing, Gonzalez is likely more valuable in Colorado than he would be anywhere else. Look at his home-road splits the last three years:

2010: 1.161 home OPS, .775 road
2011:  .999 home, .757 road
2012:  1.174 home, .847 road

In general, players with significant splits who have left Coors have tended to fare quite a bit better on the road with their new teams. Gonzalez, though, is just so awesome at Coors Field it’d be a shame to take him out of it. Also, his excellent range in left field is more useful there than it would be just about anywhere else (though another team could try putting him back in center).

For the other, $40 million doesn’t seem all that excessive for two players of that quality. And in the meantime, they’ll cost a combined $20.5 million next year and $26.5 million in 2014.

Sherman, of course, puts Gonzalez in play with the Yankees, noting how prospects Manny Banuelos, Gary Sanchez, Eduardo Nunez, Mason Williams and Dante Bichette Jr. could be made available (he even mentions how Bichette’s dad was a Rockies star). And Gonzalez would look nice in pinstripes, just as he would any uniform in the bigs.

The Rockies, though, would need a huge bounty to even consider letting Gonzalez go. It’s doubtful it’s something they’d give serious thought to anyway. If longtime GM Dan O’Dowd ships off Gonzalez now and commits to a full rebuild, there’s a good chance he won’t survive to see the fruits of it two or three years down the line.

Here are the lineups for NLCS Game 5

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It’s tied 2-2, but if you’re like most people you have feelings about who has an edge.

Maybe you’re a “momentum” person and you like the Cubs’ current vibe because they scored a bunch last night. Maybe you’re a “momentum is your next day’s starting pitcher” guy, and you prefer either Jon Lester or Kenta Maeda. Or maybe you’re playing chess with all of this and thinking a couple of moves ahead. As in “yes, the Cubs have an advantage tonight because Lester is better than Maeda, but if they DON’T win tonight they’re screwed because then they have to face Kershaw and Hill in Games 6 and 7.”

I dunno. I find all of that rather exhausting. Let’s just watch and see what happens. Here’s who will be doing the happening:


1. Dexter Fowler (S) CF
2. Kris Bryant (R) 3B
3. Anthony Rizzo (L) 1B
4. Ben Zobrist (S) LF
5. Javier Baez (R) 2B
6. Jason Heyward (L) RF
7. Addison Russell (R) SS
8. David Ross (R) C
9. Jon Lester (L) LHP


1. Kiké Hernández (R) 2B
2. Justin Turner (R) 3B
3. Corey Seager (L) SS
4. Carlos Ruiz (R) C
5. Howie Kendrick (R) LF
6. Adrian González (L) 1B
7. Yasiel Puig (R) RF
8. Joc Pederson (L) CF
9. Kenta Maeda (R) RHP


Trevor Bauer says his finger will be OK for the World Series

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Trevor Bauer #47 of the Cleveland Indians walks back to the dugout after being relieved due to his cut pinky finger in the first inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Indians starter Trevor Bauer said he expects his sliced right pinkie to heal in time for the World Series.

Bauer, of course, is a drone hobbyist and hurt his finger while fixing a drone. By the time he’ll have to pitch again he will have had nine days since his last, bloody start in ALCS Game 3. Yesterday he said “I’ll be ready to pitch in the World Series whenever they need me. I’m doing everything I can and I’ll be back out there for sure.”

Bauer reportedly suggested that Indians trainers cauterize his finger on Monday. They declined. Which is something Bauer should probably thank them for.