Breaking news: Orioles prospect Dylan Bundy is human

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Orioles stud prospect Dylan Bundy was almost literally unhittable at low Single-A to begin the season, throwing 30 innings with a 0.00 ERA and 40/2 K/BB ratio while holding opponents to a .053 batting average.

That earned him a promotion to high Single-A and Bundy has continued to pitch well there with a 23/6 K/BB ratio in 19 innings–particularly considering he’s just 19 years old–but he’s also allowed at least one run in all four of his starts and yesterday struggled for the first time as a pro.

Bundy failed to make it out of the fourth inning while allowing four runs, including his third homer in four starts, and now has a 4.42 ERA at high Single-A.

None of which changes the fact that he’s among the truly elite handful of prospects in all of baseball, but it does show why teams don’t just rush a prospect through the farm system when he dominates at the lower levels. Bundy still projects as a future ace and still figures to be in the majors by his 21st birthday, but it turns out he’s also human.

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.