Baseball’s hottest hitter? Would you believe Trevor Plouffe?

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Trevor Plouffe was hitting .133 on May 14 and the 26-year-old former first-round pick had a .212 batting average for his career, which along with the Twins not trusting him to play shortstop had him in danger of potentially being designated for assignment.

Instead he’s been the hottest hitter in baseball since then. Seriously.

Plouffe homered last night for the third consecutive game and 11th time in his last 21 games. He’s hitting .305 with a .768 slugging percentage during that span and has now taken over as the Twins’ everyday third baseman despite not playing the position regularly in the minors or majors before last month.

He’ll come back down to earth soon enough, but Plouffe’s power potential shouldn’t be dismissed as a fluke. His career batting average still isn’t pretty, but even when he was struggling overall Plouffe showed plenty of pop and through 521 plate appearances as a big leaguer he has 22 homers and 26 doubles.

This season–combining his awful start with his recent Babe Ruth impression–he has an Isolated Power (slugging percentage minus batting average) of .303, which ranks third in the American League behind only Josh Hamilton and Adam Dunn.

And if that’s not enough to make Twins fans optimistic about Plouffe’s upside, Parker Hageman of Twins Daily broke down his altered swing mechanics and shows frame-by-frame where all this power is coming from.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.