Theo Epstein talks about the “monster” that was created in Boston

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Alex Speier has a great interview up with Theo Epstein over at WEEI today. In it Epstein talks candidly about what went wrong towards the end in Boston. Specifically, how a team that was built into a success with player development and home grown talent got into the business of signing people like John Lackey and Carl Crawford to mega deals.

Espstein says that success builds a “new baseline” and that they were always trying to do more. Which, in turn, caused the team — and he includes himself and everyone in the organization — to lose its way and forget its principles:

“Had we been completely true to our baseball philosophy that we set out and believed in and followed, we probably wouldn’t have made certain moves that we made anyway, moves that, as I look back on them, they were probably moves too much of convenience, of placating elements that shouldn’t have been important,” said Epstein. “Those were my mistakes, and because of that the last couple of years weren’t as successful as the previous seven or so.”

Great interview, not just for what Epstein says, but for how Speier describes and characterizes them. He’s one of the best in the business.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.