There was a big baseball scandal, sorta

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Ben Badler of Baseball America reports on an age/identity scandal involving one of the more notable buscones in the Dominican Republic, who actually falsified his own son’s age in order to induce the Mariners into signing him:

A son of Enrique Soto, one of the most powerful trainers in the Dominican Republic over the last two decades, used a false age when he signed with the Mariners in 2007, according to multiple sources familiar with the case.

George Soto signed with Seattle for $700,000 in February 2007, presenting himself as a 17-year-old shortstop with a birthdate of Nov. 19, 1989. According to George Soto’s new paperwork, he was born Nov. 17, 1985, which would have made him 21 when he signed.

That’s interesting as far as these things go and will likely be cited by MLB as one of the excesses of the current system as it continues to push for an international draft.  But that’s not why I’m posting this. I’m posting this because, man, I kinda feel let down.

Why? Because almost all of the baseball people on Twitter were watching this one closely for like a half hour thanks to Badler’s delicious tweet prior to posting the story:

Exciting! So exciting that it led to all kinds of fun and mostly ridiculous speculation as to what it might be.  Among my favorites:

 

 

My personal theory involved either (a) Aroldis Chapman being Keyser Soze; or (b) players actually taking them two or three games at a time instead of the alleged one game at a time they so often claim.

So, yeah, I’m let down. It’s not Badler’s fault. He’s a fine reporter and on his beat this stuff with Enrique Soto is big news and is, technically, scandalous.

But I really was hoping that we were aiming higher, or lower, on this sleepy Wednesday afternoon.

Report: Brewers sign Yovani Gallardo to a major league deal

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Free agent right-hander Yovani Gallardo is headed back to the Brewers on a major league deal, The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports. No other terms have been reported yet, as the agreement is still pending a physical.

Gallardo, 31, completed a one-year run with the Mariners before getting his $13 million option declined by the team last month. He provided little value during his time in Seattle, pitching to a 5-10 record in 22 starts and putting up a 5.72 ERA, 4.1 BB/9 and 6.5 SO/9 in 130 2/3 innings as both a starter and reliever.

Still, assuming the veteran righty is on the cusp of a comeback, he may as well try for it with his original club. Gallardo last appeared for the Brewers from 2007 to 2014, racking up a cumulative 20.8 fWAR and peaking during the 2010 season, when he earned his first All-Star nomination and Silver Slugger award. This will be his ninth career season with the club.

Even with Gallardo aboard, the Brewers are expected to continue deepening their pitching stores for 2018. With team ace Jimmy Nelson still recovering from shoulder surgery, the club will enter the season with a projected rotation of Gallardo, Zach Davies, Chase Anderson and Junior Guerra, the latter of whom pitched just 70 1/3 innings in 2017 following a right calf strain and shin contusion. Another big name pitcher could help cement Milwaukee’s rotation and keep them competitive for another year, though they don’t appear to have made any concrete moves in that direction so far.