So far Bryce Harper is the best 19-year-old hitter of all time

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Last night Bryce Harper launched a mammoth home run and then gave the leader in the clubhouse for best quote of the season, and he’s already followed that up by hitting a double this afternoon against the Blue Jays.

Midway through his 41st career game Harper is now hitting .309 with a .391 on-base percentage and .559 slugging percentage, which is good for a .950 OPS that would be the highest for a 19-year-old in baseball history.

Here’s the all-time leaderboard among 19-year-olds with at least 200 plate appearances:

Mel Ott              1928     .921
Tony Conigliaro      1964     .883
Mickey Mantle        1951     .792
Cesar Cedeno         1970     .790
Freddie Lindstrom    1925     .761
Edgar Renteria       1996     .757
Ty Cobb              1906     .749
Ken Griffey Jr.      1989     .748

That’s quite a list.

He’ll inevitably go through a rough patch at some point and may come back down to earth a bit in general, but so far Harper has shown no signs of slowing down and in fact has hit .370 in his last 100 trips to the plate.

Right now it’s not a stretch to say that Harper is the best 19-year-old hitter of all time.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.