Quote of the Day: Zack Greinke would like to give his barber a shoutout

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Zack Greinke returned to Kansas City last night. After the game he spoke at length about his time in Kansas City, the state of the Royals and other such matters. The best exchange came after the reporter noticed that Greinke got a haircut that day:

Q: Any special meaning with the haircut today or was it just time?

A: Nah, [it was my] haircut guy from back in the day. He used to have a cool charm of some clippers, but they’re gone now. He does a good job. He told me to give him a shout-out today, too.

Q: What’s his name?

A: I wish I knew.

I love Greinke. I really do.

Less frivolously, the interview is an interesting one in that Greinke says that he was “pretty rude” in leaving the Royals, but felt he had to because if he was being a nice guy they never would have traded him. He offers a bunch of other pretty unvarnished honesty too. About the state of the Royals and some other things.

I guess what I like most about him is that he seems totally incapable of offering standard ballplayer cliches. He seems to think about the question given him and answers it in a direct way.  It’s a crime how little that happens when ballplayers, politicians and anyone else in the public spotlight is concerned.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.