Quote of the Day: Zack Greinke would like to give his barber a shoutout

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Zack Greinke returned to Kansas City last night. After the game he spoke at length about his time in Kansas City, the state of the Royals and other such matters. The best exchange came after the reporter noticed that Greinke got a haircut that day:

Q: Any special meaning with the haircut today or was it just time?

A: Nah, [it was my] haircut guy from back in the day. He used to have a cool charm of some clippers, but they’re gone now. He does a good job. He told me to give him a shout-out today, too.

Q: What’s his name?

A: I wish I knew.

I love Greinke. I really do.

Less frivolously, the interview is an interesting one in that Greinke says that he was “pretty rude” in leaving the Royals, but felt he had to because if he was being a nice guy they never would have traded him. He offers a bunch of other pretty unvarnished honesty too. About the state of the Royals and some other things.

I guess what I like most about him is that he seems totally incapable of offering standard ballplayer cliches. He seems to think about the question given him and answers it in a direct way.  It’s a crime how little that happens when ballplayers, politicians and anyone else in the public spotlight is concerned.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”