Men’s Journal survey: A.J. Pierzynski is baseball’s most hated player. Philly has the most obnoxious fans

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Men’s Journal didn’t exactly get a scientific sample, but they did survey 100 ballplayers to find out who the most hated man in baseball is. Because he always tops such lists you will not be surprised to learn that A.J. Pierzynski tops this one too:

In a Men’s Journal survey of 100 Major League Baseball players, White Sox catcher A.J. Pierzynski was voted “most hated player” with 34% of the votes. “He likes to talk a lot of sh**, and I’ve heard he’s a bad teammate,” one National League pitcher tells Men’s Journal. “He’s been a prick to guys on his own pitching staff. Basically, if you haven’t got five years in the big leagues, he treats you like you’re a peasant. He’s that kind of guy.”

To be honest, I’m way more interested in knowing what ballplayer uses phrases like “he treats you like a peasant” than I am in learning how much of a prick Pierzynski is, but I suppose Men’s Journal needs to preserve anonymity. In other player voting:

Philadelphia was crowned the city with the most obnoxious fans. “They boo their own players,” one opponent tells the magazine.

Moving right along, Todd Coffey was voted the player in the worst shape:

“Have you seen him running in from the bullpen?” says a division rival of Coffey. “He has bigger boobs than half the girls I’ve dated.”

Thanks, division rival. We really needed to know that.

The full poll results are published in the July issue of Men’s Journal on newsstands Friday, June 15.  There will also be pictures of dudes in better shape than you, which will make you sorta hate yourself.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.