Dave Boswell: 1945-2012

2 Comments

Dave Boswell, who won 20 games as a 24-year-old in 1969 and pitched eight seasons in the majors for the Twins, Tigers, and Orioles, has passed away at age 67.

Boswell’s former teammate, Hall of Famer Bert Blyleven, tweeted the sad news last night.

Boswell debuted with the Twins as a 19-year-old in 1964 and posted a sub-3.50 ERA in each of his first five full seasons. That run culminated in 20 wins and a 3.23 ERA in 256 innings in 1969 as the Twins won the division title, but Boswell was never the same after throwing 10.2 innings in a postseason start versus the Orioles.

He’d gone 64-47 with a 3.28 ERA in 968 innings through age 24, but logged a total of 98 innings with a 5.90 ERA from age 25 on and threw his last big-league pitch as a 26-year-old in 1971.

Blyleven is the only player in Twins history to start more games, log more innings, strike out more batters, or record more wins than Boswell through age 24. And despite the premature end to Boswell’s very promising career I ranked him as the 36th-best player in Minnesota Twins history.

Kyle Schwarber is “probably, arguably” in The Best Shape of His Life

Getty Images
1 Comment

Joe Maddon just held his annual media availability here at the Winter Meetings. During the scrum he said that Kyle Schwarber “looked great the other day” at a Cubs community event and that . . . wait for it . . . “he’s in, probably, arguably in the best shape of his life.” Maddon went on to say that, if Schwarber looks good in spring training, he might even be the Cubs leadoff hitter in 2018.

Schwarber is only 24, but the former catcher turned outfielder is going to spend most of his career as a DH, with another team obviously, unless he shows the Cubs that he can be a regular defender. The Cubs would love to see him in better shape whether they keep him or shop him, and if it’s the latter, they’ll want to show potential trade partners that he can play defense so as not to limit his market. It’s in everyone’s interests for him to be lean, mean and a bit more flexible once spring training starts.

To that end, according to a recent report, Schwarber “has been on a mission this offseason to transform his body.” And now Maddon is playing up the BSOHL angle. Whether that’s salesmanship or not, all eyes are going to be on Schwarber come February.