And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Yankees 3, Braves 0: Ivan Nova shut out Atlanta for seven innings and four relievers handled the last two. Atlanta didn’t even get a runner to third base all night. The Yankees have won four in a row, nine of 11 and are now tied for first place in the AL East.

Nationals 6, Blue Jays 3: And the Nats take advantage of the Braves loss to extend their lead in the NL East. Bryce Harper had three hits and drove in a run. Adam LaRoche hit a two-run homer. The big news here, though, was Brandon Morrow leaving after just nine pitches with an oblique injury.

Marlins 4, Red Sox 1: Miami finally wins one after a six-game losing streak. Meanwhile, Boston loses another. Seventh time in eight games, actually.

Angels 3, Dodgers 2: The Dodgers jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first with help from a bad pickoff throw at the second that Mike Trout made worse when trying to field it in center. But Trout homered in the fourth, singled in a run in the sixth and Pujols won the sucker with an RBI single — scoring Trout — in the ninth. Trout is on pace to score approximately 1,349,593 runs this season. Approximately.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.