Torii Hunter, Mark Trumbo

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights


Angels 10, Rockies 8: Mark Trumbo hit two three-run homers to help the Angels complete what was nothing short of an annihilation of the Rockies’ pitching staff. Trumbo is at .326/.380/.632. It would have been optimistic to predict those numbers from Pujols before the season started.

Nationals 4, Red Sox 3: Bryce Harper had the day off until the ninth inning when he was inserted as a pinch hitter. Drew a walk and then hauled it all the way home from first on a Roger Bernadina double that proved to be the game-winner. Washington swept Boston.

Yankees 5, Mets 4: Russell Martin hit two homers including the walkoff as the Yankees sweep the Mets after finding themselves down 3-0 in the seventh. All of the blown saves, bad defense and late-inning heroics obscured the fact that Andy Pettitte and Jon Niese both pitched really well. Especially good news for Niese after the rapid heartbeat stuff from last week.

Rangers 5, Giants 0: Tim Lincecum’s nightmare season continues. Five runs on nine hits in five and two-thirds. Bad game for the Rangers’ starter too: Alexi Ogando strained a groin running the bases. All the anti-DH people like me are sitting over in the corner, hat pulled low, trying to be inconspicuous.

Astros 11, White Sox 9: Four homers from Astros hitters. Apropos of nothing, I went to Huntington Park and watched the Columbus Clippers play the Charlotte Knights — Chicago’s Triple-A team — on Saturday night. Thing I did not know:  Pete Rose, Jr. is the first base coach of the Knights. He wears number 14, natch. Also, their manager is Joel Skinner and he got ejected in hilarious fashion. A really fun, arms waving in the air rant. Oh, and there’s a place in that park where there are paintings of all of the Columbus Clippers teams from the time they were a Yankees affiliate. This one is my favorite. My second favorite is the one with Hideki Irabu.

Dodgers 8, Mariners 2: A six-run second inning capped by an Andre Ethier grand slam. Remember when the M’s no-hit the Dodgers on Friday? Nah, me neither.

Brewers 6, Padres 5: Ryan Braun homered and drove in three. Martin Maldonado drove in three more with a homer as Milwaukee takes two of three from the lowly Padres.

Diamondbacks 4, Athletics 3: Five in a row for the Snakes and seven of eight overall. Paul Goldschmidt’s hitting streak is at 17 games.

Indians 4, Cardinals 1: Jason Kipnis — who most people don’t know but who is all kinds of awesome and you should get to know him a bit — hit a tiebreaking three-run homer in the ninth. Chris Perez got the save despite basically barfing between pitches in the ninth. He blamed it on drinking warm water that “just didn’t settle well.” Maybe go with the cold next time, big guy.

Cubs 8, Twins 2: Ryan Dempster throws eight shutout innings. The other Cubs look at him like the inmates look at the inmate who’s gonna be released soon.

Pirates 3, Royals 2: Andrew McCutchen homered and drove in three runs. A.J. Burnett won his fifth straight. He’s 6-2 with a 3.61 ERA on the year and is really making it hard for those of us who think that “some guys just can’t pitch in New York” thing is baloney. Four in a row for Pittsburgh and eight of ten. Oh, and the Pirates are tied for first place now.

Blue Jays 12, Braves 4: Brett Lawrie and Colby Rasmus combined for six RBI at the top of the order. Atlanta had a 4-0 lead at one point in this one but nope. Braves relievers Livan Hernandez and Cristhian Martinez got whupped up on in particularly fierce fashion.

Orioles 5, Phillies 4: Baltimore beats Philly in extra innings. This is not a rerun from Saturday night. Instead of an Adam Jones homer it was a Matt Weiters double that drove home the game-winner.

Rays 4, Marlins 2: The Rays outscored the Marlins 22-7. At one point the bullpen phone didn’t work. Probably some new crazy phone technology for the new park. They should go old school like Commander Adama and insist on old school land lines.

Tigers 7, Reds 6: Aroldis Chapman came in with two men on in the eighth and the Reds up 6-3, allowed both runners to score and allowed two of his own to score in what was easily his worst appearance of the year. In other news, Angel Hernandez was behind the plate and decided that it was “mess with Ryan Ludwick” night. I’ve never seen a batter get messed with by an ump like Hernandez did with Ludwick. Everything was a strike. Like, Tigers pitchers could throw it to Newport, Kentucky and it would be a strike.

Jacob deGrom outduels Clayton Kershaw, Mets take 1-0 NLDS lead

Jacob de Grom
AP Photo/Kathy Willens

Jacob deGrom put together one of the best post-season starts in Mets history, outdueling three-time Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw to pitch his team into a 1-0 NLDS lead. The right-hander fanned 13 over seven shutout innings, holding the Dodgers to five hits and a walk as the Mets won 3-1.

deGrom’s game score of 79 is the fifth-best by a Mets starter in the playoffs, behind Jon Matlack, Mike Hampton, Bobby Jones, and Tom Seaver, according to Baseball Reference. As Katie Sharp notes on Twitter, deGrom is one of three pitchers to hold the opposition scoreless on 13 or more strikeouts and one or fewer walks. The other two are Tim Lincecum and Mike Scott.

In the eighth inning, reliever Tyler Clippard allowed a one-out double to Howie Kendrick followed by an RBI single to Adrian Gonzalez as the Dodgers finally got on the board. Closer Jeurys Familia entered and recorded the final out of the eighth inning by inducing a weak line out from Justin Turner. In the ninth, Familia worked a 1-2-3 frame to wrap up the game.

Kershaw remains winless in the post-season since Game 1 of the 2013 NLDS, a span of seven starts. He gave up a solo home run to Daniel Murphy in the fourth inning, then walked the bases loaded in the seventh inning before departing with two outs. Reliever Pedro Baez entered and allowed two of his inherited runners to score when David Wright lined a single to center field. On the evening, Kershaw was on the hook for three runs on four hits and four walks with 11 strikeouts. Though he lost his command a bit towards the end of his start, the lefty pitched quite well and will be on the receiving end of some unnecessary criticism as a result of taking another post-season loss.

deGrom and Kershaw both struck out 11 batters, the first time that has happened in a major league post-season game.

Michael Cuddyer didn’t look too good out in left field for the Mets.

Game 2 of the NLDS will continue on Saturday at 9:00 PM EDT. Noah Syndergaard will start for the Mets opposite Zack Greinke of the Dodgers.

Clayton Kershaw, Jacob deGrom create MLB first with 11 strikeouts each in the playoffs

Jacob deGrom
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

For the first time in major league history, both pitchers in a playoff game have struck out at least 11 batters, per’s Paul Casella. Mets starter Jacob deGrom has pitched just a hair better than Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw overall. deGrom has blanked the Dodgers over six frames on five hits and a walk. Kershaw made one mistake, resulting in a solo home run to Daniel Murphy in the fourth inning. He’s allowed four hits and four walks total in 6 2/3 innings.

The last time opposing starters each struck out 10 in a post-season game was back in 1944 in Game 5 of the World Series when Mort Cooper of the St. Louis Cardinals struck out 12 and Denny Galehouse of the St. Louis Browns struck out 10.

Michael Cuddyer not shining in left field early in NLDS Game 1

Michael Cuddyer
AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek

Mets outfielder Michael Cuddyer has already made a pair of mistakes in left field and he’s only four innings into the first game of the best-of-five NLDS against the Dodgers.

Leading off the second inning, Justin Turner sent a well-struck liner to Cuddyer which was quite catchable, but the ball clanked off of the veteran’s glove. Turner was credited with a double. Mets starter Jacob deGrom was able to work around the misplay, striking out Andre Ethier, A.J. Ellis, and Clayton Kershaw to close out the frame.

With two outs in the third inning, Corey Seager sent a fly ball down the left field line. Cuddyer took an inefficient route and the ball bounced about a foot inside the foul line, then into the stands, giving Seager a ground-rule double. To add insult to injury, Cuddyer ended up tumbling over the fence. deGrom, again, worked around Cuddyer’s mistake, striking out Adrian Gonzalez to end the inning.

Because he bats right-handed, Cuddyer got the start in left field over the left-handed-hitting rookie Michael Conforto against Kershaw, a southpaw. Conforto mustered only a .481 OPS against lefties this season compared to Cuddyer’s .698. Despite the batting disparity, one wonders how short a leash manager Terry Collins has on Cuddyer given his defense.