Thanks to the new draft rules, Scott Boras (and other agents) have a pretty stark conflict of interest

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The other day Scott Boras called the new draft setup “a mockery,” and claimed that the capping of bonus payouts and the slotting for picks — with stiff penalties for teams who violate them — does nothing to distribute talent to those who need it (i.e. the purpose of the draft).

I think he’s probably right about that. Just ask the Cubs who, if they were allowed to, would go after the best talent they could find, overpaying for it if they had to. Now they’re capped and it will take longer to rebuild a farm system in desperate need of rebuilding.  And why? To save owners money on draft bonuses. Money which, in the grand scheme of things is a drop in the bucket compared to what they pay mediocre free agents all the time.

But, as reader Aaron Ashcraft pointed out on Twitter, the finite money paid out by teams creates another problem too. One for Scott Boras and other agents: a potential for a pretty stark conflict of interest.

I’ve talked for years about how Boras often has a conflict of interest due to his representing multiple high-level free agents each winter. When he represented Matt Holliday and Johnny Damon in the same offseason, any effort he made to play up Damon as a left fielder to someone harmed Holliday’s market to some degree and vice-versa. It wasn’t irreconcilable —  after all, if a team wants to sign Boras free agent A and Boras free agent B, they technically can, because there’s no salary cap and I’m sure Boras clients knew what they were getting into to begin with — but it does create a perception problem.

But the draft is more stark. Teams have a finite pool of money to hand out to their draft picks, and every dollar one gets is, by necessity, a dollar not available to another.  As Aaron pointed out to me, Boras represents Astros draftee Lance McCullars and draftee Rio Ruiz. While there are slots involved, the more important number is the overall pool of dough the Astros have left to sign their picks because you can go over slot for individual players as long as you don’t break your draft cap. If Boras makes a push for Houston to pay McCullers a few dollars more, isn’t that necessarily harming Ruiz?

Again, I’m not saying Boras is doing anything wrong here. I’m sure he discloses all of these ins and outs to his clients, has them sign the necessary waiver of conflicts forms and all of the other sorts of things a careful lawyer and agent does.  But this still seems like a problem to me that, at the very least, would make me wary of signing with an agent who typically represents a large number of drafted players.

Giants place Hunter Pence on 10-day disabled list with right thumb sprain

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The Giants placed outfielder Hunter Pence on the 10-day disabled list with a right thumb sprain, per an official announcement on Friday. Pence initially sustained the injury during the club’s home opener on April 3, when he dove to intercept a line drive double from Robinson Cano and jammed his thumb. Weeks of playing through the pain hasn’t worked, so he’ll take a breather while the Giants give outfielder Mac Williamson a chance to start in left after getting called up from Triple-A Fresno.

Pence, 35, wouldn’t pin his recent struggles on his injury, but it’s clear that he’s having difficulty finding his footing this year. He slashed a meager .172/.197/.190 through 61 plate appearances in 2018, collecting just one extra-base hit and two walks during the Giants’ dismal 7-11 stretch. While it’s far too early in the season to make any final judgments, it doesn’t look like the veteran outfielder will be replicating the .275+ average, 4.0+ fWAR totals of years past (at least, not anytime soon).

Williamson, meanwhile, has gotten off to a hot start in Triple-A. Prior to his call-up this weekend, the 27-year-old batted an incredible .487/.600/1.026 with six home runs and a 1.626 OPS through his first 50 PA. A hot Triple-A bat doesn’t always survive the transition to the majors, but the Giants will use all the help they can get — especially as they take on the AL West-leading Angels this weekend.