Ralph Nader hates in-game ads on Yankees broadcasts, is completely ignorant

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Ralph Nader has done a lot of good in his life. I mean, if it wasn’t for him we’d probably all be driving boss-looking Chevy Corvairs right now but then dying in horrible wrecks later. So thanks, Ralph!

But the dude has often been off-the-mark in his latter years.  Today came another instance, and it involves the Yankees.

Seems he and his fan-advocacy group, League of Fans, hates the in-game advertisements during Yankees radio broadcasts. You know the ones: “Safely at second is Jones. And your family can be safe and secure with financial protection from New York Life Insurance Company.”

I don’t like those either, but they don’t get me all bent out of shape like Nader is. He wrote to the Yankees today, complaining about the ads:

“Have you no boundaries or sense of restraint?” Nader wrote, in his position as the founder of the sports advocacy group League of Fans. “Have you no mercy on your play-calling broadcasters? … Nader recalled growing up in Connecticut listening to Mel Allen call Yankee games “when the commercials were reserved for the commercial breaks—between half-innings.” Now, he said, the between-the-batter and between-the-pitch ads “have become a significant part of the broadcast.”

Nader liked listening to the commercials-during-breaks-only days of Mel Allen? Really? He liked those back in the ideal days of youth?  Well, he musta been listening to a totally different Mel Allen broadcast than anyone else, because the rest of the Yankees fans of his vintage heard Mel Allen dropping ads for Yankees sponsor Ballantine Beer, coining the term “Ballantine Blast.” As in “Mantle drives one to right … it’s gone! There goes another Ballantine Blast! How about that!”

At other times the Yankees were sponsored by Getty Oil. The announcers would refer to “Getty Goners.” As in “there’s another Getty Goner for Graig Nettles!”  Mel Allen may have done those too, though I’m told that it lasted into the 70s.

The lesson: most of the time, when people say that things were better than when they were kids, they’re full of crap.

Unless they’re Pirates fans over 30, in which case it’s accurate.

Sean Manaea pitches the first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.