Neil Walker

Neil Walker is your clutch god

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Update: Dejan’s tweet was a joke. My apologies for taking it seriously and using it to make a point. I don’t want to take the post down and I think my point still stands, but I want to make it clear that Mr. Kovacevic does not actually feel the way described below.

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At least, that’s the theory being put forth by former Pirates beat guy turned columnist Dejan Kovacevic:

source:

And, yeah, there’s no doubt that Walker has been clutch over the course of his career. Look at his lines:

Bases empty: .247/.301/.365
Runners on: .320/.379/.480
RISP………..: .295/.363/.429
RISP w/2 outs: .257/.340/.396
Bases loaded: .565/.538/.913 (13-for-23, 1 HR)

So, the Pittsburgh media, or Kovacevic at least, celebrates Walker’s clutchness.

But why on earth should we? The idea that Walker steps up his performance for one or two at-bats every night instead of the four he gets? That he can’t be at his absolute best for the entire five to eight minutes he spends in the batter’s box a night, but only the five or 10 at-bats he gets per week in bigger situations?

That would be a failing, not a thing to celebrate.

Because if we accept that Walker is clutch — that his numbers with runners on and the bases loaded are no fluke — then we’re admitting he’s an awful hitter the other 60 percent of the time.

Now, I don’t think any of that is the case. Maybe Walker has some concentration issues that’s led to his splits, but I think it’s more likely that those splits will simply begin to even out with time. I don’t believe that Walker is a lousy hitter who turns into a good one with men on base, nor do I believe that he’s a great one who just doesn’t really try when no one is on. Neither explanation makes much sense to me.

A fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 24:  A fan is escorted by police out of the New York Yankees dugout after climbing onto its roof, stumbling and falling into the dugout during the game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on August 24, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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Per Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, a fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field in the eighth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Mariners.

The Yankees were heading into the bottom half of the inning when catcher Brian McCann heard “a loud thud” and looked over to find a fan laying on the dugout floor. According to McCann, the fan “basically knocked himself out.”

Manager Joe Girardi said the incident “kind of freaked me out, actually.”

McCann added, “You don’t know his intentions. It looked like he was trying to run on the field, but he didn’t make it there. It could have been worse.”

That McCann and Girardi aren’t immediately trusting of an uninvited visitor to the dugout has merit. In 2002, two fans ran onto the field and attacked Tom Gamboa, then the Royals’ first base coach. One of the two was in possession of a knife. Typically, fans that trespass are drunk and want attention, but to echo McCann’s sentiment, you never know.

Yu Darvish hit a home run

CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 24: Yu Darvish #11 of the Texas Rangers grounds into a double play in the second inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on August 24, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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There’s a headline you’ve never read before. Rangers starter Yu Darvish has taken 12 plate appearances in the major leagues over parts of four seasons and has yet to homer. Not surprising. He pitches in the American League and wasn’t a particularly great hitter when he pitched in Japan, either. He had four singles and a double in 38 PA over parts of seven seasons from 2005-11.

Which made this all the better:

That was a 1-2 fastball from Reds starter Tim Adleman and Darvish hit it out to dead center field at Great American Ball Park. That’s a ride.