A “well-known” retired ballplayer is the focus of an insider trading probe

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A lot of ballplayers retire comfortably in sunny California. Some, the Securities and Exchange Commission believe, may be retiring too comfortably:

An ongoing insider trading investigation by U.S. prosecutors in Los Angeles is focusing on a retired, well-known baseball player and several other former athletes whose names have not yet been disclosed, said two people familiar with the situation.

The former athletes under scrutiny – mainly a group of professional baseball players – are allegedly part of what one U.S. investigatory government official described as “a loose federation of people” sharing important market-moving information about various companies before it becomes public.

Last year former Orioles third baseman Doug DeCinces got popped for $2.5 million for trading on an inside tip.  I grew up with the guy, but I’m not sure that I’d call him a “well-known” baseball player, so it’s likely a bigger name than that.

Wouldn’t it blow your mind if it was Canseco? And he was playing crazy in order to hide the fact that he was masterminding a sophisticated insider trading ring?  That would be pretty cool.

(thanks to Dennis T. for the heads up)

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.