Aroldis Chapman finally gave up an earned run

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After thoroughly dominating major league hitters over the first two months of the season, Aroldis Chapman finally gave up his first earned run tonight against the Pirates. And it was courtesy of some unlikely contributors.

Chapman entered the game with the score tied in the 10th inning. He quickly gave up a leadoff ground-rule double to Clint Barmes, who entered tonight’s action with a miserable .188/.211/.305 batting line over his first 50 games this season. It was actually the first hit Chapman had allowed since May 17, a span of 8 2/3 innings. Then Michael McKenry, who entered play tonight with a .207/.271/.326 career batting line, punched a 99 mph fastball to the right-center field gap for another double which plated Barmes with the go-ahead run. The Pirates ended up winning the game 5-4. Baseball sure is a funny game sometimes.

Chapman previously gave up an unearned run against the Mets back on May 17, but the Cuban left-hander had a perfect 0.00 ERA through 29 innings this season until McKenry’s run-scoring double. It was the first time he had allowed an earned run in a major league game since last September 10, a span of 35 innings and 29 appearances.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.